plasma physics


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plasma physics

[′plaz·mə ′fiz·iks]
(physics)
The study of highly ionized gases.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
His contribution to plasma physics was recognized by the award of the Alfven Prize of the European Physical Society.
To observe reconnection, Masaaki Yamada and his colleagues at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey are slamming together pairs of doughnut-shaped plasma clouds known as spheromaks.
He had an engaging personality and will be sorely missed by his colleagues in the world's plasma physics and fusion communities.
His work in plasma physics and fusion began in 1958 when he moved to the plasma physics department recently organized by Academician K.
Oct 29-Nov 2 54th APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting.
On May 27, researchers at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory achieved record levels of controlled fusion power.
Oct 12-Nov 2 54th APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting.
In these proceedings of the June 2005 conference, contributors present their work in plasma physics, dusty plasmas, plasma fusion, astrophysics, microelectronics and nanotechnology, including transport processes, Coulomb crystal and liquid formation, void formation, self-excited instabilities, wave propagation, nonlinear phenomena and the nucleation and growth of dust particles in these plasmas.
last December, using a magnetically confined mixture or equal parts deuterium and tritium, researchers at the Princeton University Plasma Physics laboratory and their collaborators achieve record outputs of fusion power at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (SN: 1/1/94, p.12).
The Max Planck Society is strengthening its commitment to the development of a sustainable energy supply and has joined forces with Princeton University to establish the Max Planck Princeton Research Centre for Plasma Physics.
Stacey (nuclear engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology) presents both the fundamental theories and methodologies of fusion plasma physics and introduces topics of current research.
Taking another step along the long road to extracting energy from the fusion of atomic nuclei, researchers at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory last month achieved record levels of controlled fusion power.