plaster bat

plaster bat

[′plas·tər ¦bat]
(graphic arts)
Basic working surface on which clay is turned or modeled.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
I can still remember seeing Michael Hallam completely absorbed in this dance: I remember him pouring white porcelain slip on to his plaster bat; waiting before pouring the coloured slip; lifting one end of the bat and moving it around directing the path of the coloured slip through the surface of the white slip; delighting in the process; working with the emerging pattern, pushing it in to the desired position, yet accepting the unexpected results.
The next day I demonstrated the entire process, from drawing on the plaster bat with glaze, to painting in the areas with color, to pouring the slip onto the bat.
1) Students trace an 8-inch diameter plaster bat (mold) in their sketchbooks several times and draw landscapes to practice.
Plaster bats should also be carefully inspected for any soft spots or voids, which could indicate past introduction of chips into the moist clay.
First, our Cover Story, "Monoprints on Clay" (page 17), explains a process by which images can be transferred from plaster bats to clay.
A clay extruder and shelving for everything from plaster bats to kiln furniture are crowded into this space, along with open wire racks for the temporary storage of unfinished pottery.
Most young people do not want to take the time." Even when throwing, House soaks the plaster bats to encourage the work to dry slowly.
The fibre was then strained and added to a clay slurry, spread out on plaster bats and dried to a wedgeable state.
In order to create that sense of continuous movement, O'Hagan cast 11 large plaster bats, then covered these with a liquid stoneware body containing paper and flax, which she spread by hand in swirling fluid gestures.
She uses white casting slips, later fired to 1150[degrees]C, to pick up colourful graphic images from plaster bats. A combination of slip casting and slab building, the artist gave a demonstration at the fair of how it is done.
Just as water has to be extracted from the china clay after mining and separating, Beavan also had to leave these works to dry, upside down on plaster bats. Unable to see the developing collages, there was an element of chance, especially as she used noncompatible materials alongside each other, which moved and warped differently.