Cast

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cast

1. 
a. a throw at dice
b. the resulting number shown
2. Angling
a. a trace with a fly or flies attached
b. the act or an instance of casting
3. 
a. the actors in a play collectively
b. (as modifier): a cast list
4. 
a. an object made of metal, glass, etc., that has been shaped in a molten state by being poured or pressed into a mould
b. the mould used to shape such an object
5. a fixed twist or defect, esp in the eye
6. Surgery a rigid encircling casing, often made of plaster of Paris, for immobilizing broken bones while they heal
7. Pathol a mass of fatty, waxy, cellular, or other material formed in a diseased body cavity, passage, etc.
8. the act of casting a pack of hounds
9. Falconry a pair of falcons working in combination to pursue the same quarry
10. Archery the speed imparted to an arrow by a particular bow
11. a computation or calculation
12. Palaeontol a replica of an organic object made of nonorganic material, esp a lump of sediment that indicates the internal or external surface of a shell or skeleton
13. Palaeontol a sedimentary structure representing the infilling of a mark or depression in a soft layer of sediment (or bed)

Cast

 

an exact reproduction in plaster of paris, wax, or papiermâché of some object. It is usually painted and serves primarily as a visual aid. For example, there are casts of fruits and fish, as well as of normal or pathologically altered organs or parts of the body. Casts are either taken from the object itself or executed by hand according to measurements.

Examples of casts include death masks, reproductions of the hand of a famous musician, and copies of a classical work of sculpture for teaching purposes (hence the phrase, cast studios).


Cast

 

in paleontology, an imprint that remains in sedimentary rock after the dissolution and decomposition of plants or the bodies or skeletons of animals. Casts have been found of mollusk shells, fish skeletons, jellyfish, leaves, stems, and seeds. Impressions of a whole body, especially of a skeletonless animal, are rarely preserved. (SeeFOSSIL REMAINS OF ORGANISMS.)


Cast

 

in art, a reproduction of a sculpture, an object of applied art, or some other art object obtained by taking a hard or soft mold of the original and casting a duplicate in plaster of paris, a synthetic material, or some other material. Hard molds may be made from plaster of paris, and soft molds from wax or plastic. Casts are used in museum exhibits, in restoration work, and as an aid in teaching art.


Cast

 

in paleontology, a type of fossilization of plants and animals in which the actual organic remains, for example, a shell or stem, have disappeared through oxidation or leaching, and the resulting cavity has become filled with sediment. Frequently, the imprint of fine external details may be seen on the surface of a cast. Some parts of the organism may be preserved inside a cast.

The term “cast” is also used to designate an artificial reproduction of a fossil from gypsum or synthetic materials.

cast

[kast]
(engineering)
To form a liquid or plastic substance into a fixed shape by letting it cool in the mold.
Any object which is formed by placing a castable substance in a mold or form and allowing it to solidify. Also known as casting.
(medicine)
A rigid dressing used to immobilize a part of the body.
(navigation)
To turn a ship in its own water.
To turn a ship to a desired direction without gaining either headway or sternway.
To take a sounding with the lead.
(optics)
A change in a color because of the adding of a different hue.
(paleontology)
A fossil reproduction of a natural object formed by infiltration of a mold of the object by waterborne minerals.
(physiology)
A mass of fibrous material or exudate having the form of the body cavity in which it has been molded; classified from its source, such as bronchial, renal, or tracheal.

cast, staff

In plastering, a shape, usually decorative, made in a mold and then fastened in place.

CAST

(1)
Computer Aided Software Testing

cast

(2)
References in periodicals archive ?
I got to know them intimately when abseiling down the interior of Trajan's Column: behind the expertly laid plaster cast is a circular Victorian brick chimney--with an awful lot of South Ken soot built up over the decades.
Pretreatment and posttreatment models were assessed on both plaster casts and digital models.
When fitted with a plaster cast, patients are advised to keep their casts away from water so they do not become soggy and fall apart or cause infection.
CAA RETENTION is formed over the final plaster cast, without any dental movement.
From the age of two-and-ahalf until she was nine, Stacey had plaster casts on her leg because of the haemangioma, which is wrapped round her knee.
In group I, twenty cows were repaired with transfixation pinning connected externally to plaster cast and iron frame.
But Prof Gordon Mackay, from the Ross Hall hospital in Glasgow, wanted to find a way of avoiding the musclewasting and inconvenience of plaster casts, boots and slings.
The items loaned from NML had been part of the original Hittite Gallery opened in 1931 at the Liverpool City Museum but badly damaged during the war, when all the plaster casts were destroyed.
But doctors at University Hospital used a pioneering "soft" plaster cast to fix Mason's leg without having to reconstruct his entire foot.
But following surgery, he can already stand against a wall in the bright blue plaster casts he has had since April - a dramatic improvement in his abilities since he was born with the condition in August 2005.
Students at Bright Beginnings Charter School (AZ) spent eight weeks making plaster casts of their faces.
A REVOLUTIONARY way of treating fractures without the need for surgery or plaster casts has been given a cash boost to take it to the next level.