plastic film capacitor

plastic film capacitor

[′plas·tik ¦film kə′pas·əd·ər]
(electricity)
A capacitor constructed by stacking, or forming into a roll, alternate layers of foil and a dielectric which consists of a plastic, such as polystyrene or Mylar, either alone or as a laminate with paper.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The feedthrough capacitors contain proprietary self-healing, metallised plastic film capacitor material, and use a solderless capacitor assembly technique to avoid heat damage.
Further, plastic film capacitors such as AC and DC capacitors made from polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) have received accolades for being instrumental in propelling the life and durability of film capacitors.
Plastic film capacitors hardly get warm due to the ripple current, rarely change their characteristics over time, and can be made to handle power line voltages up to 20 kV For power line voltages up to 1.2 kV aluminum electrolytic capacitors can store the same amount of current in a smaller package and at lower cost than plastic film capacitors.
The company manufactures plastic film capacitors, which are used in industries such as lighting, electronics, and telecommunications.