plastic semiconductor

plastic semiconductor

[′plas·tik ′sem·i·kən‚dək·tər]
(materials)
An organic plastic resin with a conjugated double-bond structure, such as polyacetylene; the material is a semiconductor due to resistance of electrons to transfer from one molecule to another.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The plastic semiconductor can even be printed on flexible surfaces, which makes it cheaper to use.
The plastic semiconductor can even be printed on all kinds of flexible surfaces, which makes it cheaper to use.
"Plastic semiconductor solar cell production has great advantages, one of which is low cost," said Zhu, a professor of chemistry.
Paul Heremans of the company IMEC in Leuven and his colleagues describe their novel plastic semiconductor prototype in the August Nature Materials.
We have shown that it can also be used to make solar cells using specially designed plastic semiconductors. Maybe in the future surfaces on buildings and even car roofs will routinely generate electricity with these materials.
Professor David Lidzey from Sheffield said: "We have shown that spray coating can be used to make solar cells using specially designed plastic semiconductors. The performance of our spray coated solar cells is the same as cells made with more traditional research methods, but which are impossible to scale in manufacturing.
But Rogers said there were many sensor applications for which these new plastic semiconductors were unsuitable.
Organic solar cells use extremely thin layers of plastic semiconductors, instead of silicon, to absorb light and create electricity.
Electronic labels made from plastic semiconductors can now pick up and respond to radio signals at a frequency suitable for use on products.
Plastic semiconductors could be used in a wave of new products, including disposable radio-frequency tags designed to replace bar-coded labels in baggage-handling or inventory-control systems--potentially a $4.2 billion market by 2004.
Unlike crystals, plastic semiconductors are relatively inexpensive and highly flexible.