plate tectonics


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

plate tectonics,

theory that unifies many of the features and characteristics of continental driftcontinental drift,
geological theory that the relative positions of the continents on the earth's surface have changed considerably through geologic time. Though first proposed by American geologist Frank Bursley Taylor in a lecture in 1908, the first detailed theory of
..... Click the link for more information.
 and seafloor spreadingseafloor spreading,
theory of lithospheric evolution that holds that the ocean floors are spreading outward from vast underwater ridges. First proposed in the early 1960s by the American geologist Harry H.
..... Click the link for more information.
 into a coherent model and has revolutionized geologists' understanding of continents, ocean basins, mountains, and earth history.

Development of Plate Tectonics Theory

The beginnings of the theory of plate tectonics date to around 1920, when Alfred WegenerWegener, Alfred Lothar
, 1880–1930, German geologist, meteorologist, and Arctic explorer. Early in his life, he was on the staff of the aeronautical observatory at Lindenberg; was a professor of geophysics and meteorology at Hamburg from 1919 to 1924; was professor of
..... Click the link for more information.
, the German meteorologist and geophysicist, presented the first detailed accounts of how today's continentscontinent,
largest unit of landmasses on the earth. The continents include Eurasia (conventionally regarded as two continents, Europe and Asia), Africa, North America, South America, Australia, and Antarctica.
..... Click the link for more information.
 were once a large supercontinent that slowly drifted to their present positions. Others brought forth evidence, but plate tectonics processes and continental drift did not attract wide interest until the late 1950s, when scientists found the alignment of magnetic particles in rock responded to the earth's magnetic field of that time. Plotting paleomagnetic polar changes (see paleomagnetismpaleomagnetism,
study of the intensity and orientation of the earth's magnetic field as preserved in the magnetic orientation of certain minerals found in rocks formed throughout geologic time.
..... Click the link for more information.
) showed that all continents had moved across the earth over time.

Synthesized from these findings and others in geology, oceanography, and geophysics, plate tectonics theory holds that the lithospherelithosphere
, brittle uppermost shell of the earth, broken into a number of tectonic plates. The lithosphere consists of the heavy oceanic and lighter continental crusts, and the uppermost portion of the mantle.
..... Click the link for more information.
, the hard outer layer of the earth, is divided into about 7 major plates and perhaps as many as 12 smaller plates, c.60 mi (100 km) thick, resting upon a lower soft layer called the asthenosphereasthenosphere
, region in the upper mantle of the earth's interior, characterized by low-density, semiplastic (or partially molten) rock material chemically similar to the overlying lithosphere.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Because the sides of a plate are either being created or destroyed, its size and shape are continually changing. Such active plate tectonics make studying global tectonic history, especially for the ocean plates, difficult for times greater than 200 million years ago. The continents, which are c.25 mi (40 km) thick, are embedded in some of the plates, and hence move as the plates move about on the earth's surface.

The mechanism moving the plates is at present unknown, but is probably related to the transfer of heat energy or convection within the earth's mantle. If true, and the convection continues, the earth will continue to cool. This will eventually halt the mantle's motion allowing the crust to stabilize, much like what has happened on other planets and satellites in the solar system, such as Mars and the moon.

Plate Boundary Conditions

There are numerous major plate boundary conditions. When a large continental mass breaks into smaller pieces under tensional stresses, it does so along a series of cracks or faultsfault,
in geology, fracture in the earth's crust in which the rock on one side of the fracture has measurable movement in relation to the rock on the other side. Faults on other planets and satellites of the solar system also have been recognized.
..... Click the link for more information.
, which may develop into a major system of normal faults. The crust often subsides, forming a rift valleyrift valley,
elongated depression, trough, or graben in the earth's crust, bounded on both sides by normal faults and occurring on the continents or under the oceans. The central flat block forming the trough slips downward relative to the crustal blocks on either side.
..... Click the link for more information.
 similar to what is happening today in the Great Rift Valley through the Red Sea. If rifting continues, a new plate boundary will form by the process of seafloor spreading. Mid-ocean ridges, undersea mountain chains, are the locus of seafloor spreading and are the sites where new oceanic lithosphere is created by the upwelling of mantle asthenosphere.

Individual volcanoes are found along spreading centers of the mid-ocean ridge and at isolated hot spots, or rising magma plumes, not always associated with plate boundaries. The source of most hot-spot magmas is believed to be well below the lithosphere, probably at the core-mantle boundary. Hot-spot volcanoes often form long chains that result from the relative motion of the lithosphere plate over the hot-spot source.

Subduction zones along the leading edges of the shifting plates form a second type of boundary where the edges of lithospheric plates dive steeply into the earth and are reabsorbed at depths of over 400 mi (640 km). Earthquake foci form steeply inclined planes along the subduction zones, extending to depths of about 440 mi (710 km); the world's most destructive earthquakes occur along subduction zones.

A third type of boundary occurs where two plates slide past one another in a grinding, shearing manner along great faultsfault,
in geology, fracture in the earth's crust in which the rock on one side of the fracture has measurable movement in relation to the rock on the other side. Faults on other planets and satellites of the solar system also have been recognized.
..... Click the link for more information.
 called strike-slip faults or fracture zones along which the oceanic ridges are offset. Continental mountain ranges are formed when two plates containing continental crust collide. For example, the Himalayas are still rising as the plates carrying India and Eurasia come together. Mountains are also formed when ocean crust is subducted along a continental margin, resulting in melting of rock, volcanic activity, and compressional deformation of the continent margin. This is currently happening with the Andes Mts. and is believed to have occurred with the uplift of the Rockies and the Appalachians in the past.

Movement of the Continents

According to plate tectonics, the ocean basins are viewed as transient features that have periodically opened and closed, first rending and then suturing the continental masses, which are permanent features on the earth's surface. These processes have occurred many times since the earth's crust first began shifting some 3 to 3.5 billion years ago. Geologists now believe that the continents as we know them were sutured together 200 million years ago at the beginning of the Mesozoic era to form a supercontinent named Pangaea. Initial rifting along the Tethys Sea formed a northern continental mass, Laurasia, and a southern continental mass, Gondwanaland. Then plate movements caused North American and Eurasian separation coincidentally with the separation of South America, Africa, and India. Australia and Antarctica were the last to separate. The major plates are named after the dominant geographic feature on them such as the North American and South American plates.

Plate motions are believed to have transported large crustal blocks several thousand miles, suturing very different terrains together after collision with a larger mass. These "exotic" terrains may include segments of island arcs quite unrelated to the history of the continent onto which they are sutured. Some geologists believe that continents grow in size primarily by the addition of exotic terrains.

Bibliography

See E. M. Moores and R. J. Twiss, Tectonics (1995); B. F. Windley, The Evolving Continents (3d ed. 1995); K. C. Condie, Plate Tectonics and Crustal Evolution (4th ed. 1997); L. P. Zonenshain et al., Paleogeodynamics: The Plate Tectonic Evolution of the Earth (1997).

plate tectonics

See Earth.

plate tectonics

[′plāt tek′tän·iks]
(geology)
Global tectonics based on a model of the earth characterized by a small number (10-25) of semirigid plates which float on some viscous underlayer in the mantle; each plate moves more or less independently and grinds against the others, concentrating most deformation, volcanism, and seismic activity along the periphery. Also known as raft tectonics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because plate tectonics strongly influences heat flow, ancient metamorphic rocks can be used to study plate tectonics in Earth's past.
Plate tectonics dictates how continents drift apart and come back together, helps explain where volcanoes and earthquakes occur, predicts cycles of erosion and ocean circulation, and how life on Earth has evolved.
"Plate tectonics constantly recycles the planet's matter, and without it the planet would look like Mars," says Professor Allan Wilson from the Wits School of Geosciences, who was part of the research team.
It is much more engaging because it allows students to build an internally consistent, complete, and satisfying picture of plate tectonics.
But it also needs more than that--and that "extra something" comes in part from plate tectonics. So if we understand why Earth is the only planet in our own solar system with global plate tectonics, we can better understand what types of planets might ultimately harbor advanced life.
She covers from plate tectonics to plumes and back again, vertical motions, volcanism, time progressions and the relative fixity of melting anomalies, seismology, temperature and heat, petrology and geochemistry, and synthesis.
After studying plate tectonics pupils at PCMS were well aware of the causes of earthquakes but the pictures on television showed the effects.
Perhaps when he can influence the Sun, the Earth's tilt and Plate Tectonics he may have my undivided attention.
On the other hand, a far different perspective on the meaning of niflega has been offered: Many non-Jewish "Creationist" websites relate niflega to catastrophic plate tectonics (see below); a cataclysmic event that literally severed what had been a single land mass into separate continents.
Plate tectonics revolutionized the understanding of our planet, explaining how new crustal material rises from Earth's mantle, spreads across Earth's surface, and returns to its interior--in a continuous, conveyor-belt-like process that rifts continents, opens and closes oceans basins, and creates mountains.
In fact, they have been coming together over the last 100 million years or so, according to the theory of plate tectonics. One reference (Wikipedia) mentioned that the Arabian plate split off from the African about 35 million years ago, but this detail has since been removed from Wikipedia.
When a (sort of) mad scientist dad takes his two children to the San Andreas fault, New Madrid in Missouri, and other earthquake-heavy places, he teaches them about famous earthquakes of history, basic plate tectonics, ways in which earthquakes might be predicted in the near future, and much more.