playgoer

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playgoer

a person who goes to theatre performances, esp frequently
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Over the course of four main chapters, a substantive introduction, and a conclusion, Pangallo explores several different kinds of dramatic invention: playgoers revising their manuscripts (Walter Mountfort's The Launching of the Mary, Arthur Wilson's The Inconstant Lady), writing with special attention to the material business of staging (Robert Yarington's Two Lamentable Tragedies, John Clavell's The Soddered Citizen, William Percy's Mahomet and His Heaven), and composing verse drama (Robert Chamberlain's The Swaggering Damsel, Alexander Brome's The Cunning Lovers, Barnabe Barnes's The Devil's Charter).
Brian Cliffe, director at Louth Playgoers, said: "He worked with me on four productions and I worked on two of his lately, 'My Cousin Rachel' and 'Sherlock Holmes: the Hound of the Baskervilles'.
(1) Certainly no other extant play of the late 1580s or early 1590s withholds a disguise-discovery this way, and not until the next century would other playwrights again occasionally decide to keep a disguise secret from playgoers in such plays as Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher's Philaster, Ben Jonson's Epicoene, William Rowley's A Match at Midnight, Jasper Mayne's The City Match, and James Shirley's The Sisters.
In his epilogue, Stanev describes the prologues and inductions to Jonson's plays that seek out a playgoer who is an "understander"--that is, "a discerning, sensibly-perceptive individual" (183).
TO BEGIN BY TAKING the most extreme position: "no." There were no playgoers during the earliest days of London's public playhouses.
Newcomer describes what "A Midsummer Night's Dream" playgoers will find there as "a great setting with shade tentings, live musical accompaniment, two spectacularly designed and artistically fashioned periaktoi for our set, all the splendors of nature and the fairy world ...
Playgoers sense, especially in retrospect, that these adversaries, for the doctor, are objects not much different from the hundreds of books he has digested.
The Globe's playgoers, since they are not royal and since the actors are "flat unraised spirits," must, according to the Chorus, use their imaginations to achieve this dilation, or its approximation (Prologue 1.9, 15-25).
He was "smoking and smacking playgoers at the venue on their rear ends and back of heads" too.
The choric plea to invite audience participation actually encourages playgoers to use their imaginations to help create the play's exotic scene.