playgoer

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playgoer

a person who goes to theatre performances, esp frequently
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Her first confirmed playgoing occurs at age three and a half,
At the same time, Straznicky's work on the construction of female playreaders, Sauer's on the political appropriation of closet drama, Lesser's on black-letter nostalgia, and Berek's on the "theatricalization of public discourse" not only go a long way towards establishing that "playreading was [not] simply an extension of playgoing," but they also enlarge our "conceptualizing [of] the place of drama in the public sphere" (16).
The former went in for playgoing, horseracing, and Freemasonry, the latter for temperance and observing the Sabbath.
We have an excellent account of London playgoing in 1617, when the entire Venetian embassy went to the theatre and Chaplain Busino recorded his impressions.
Elizabeth Pepys enjoyed playgoing so much that she made her husband promise to take her with him whenever he went.
The evolution of playwriting and playgoing conventions and theater architecture over the intervening four hundred years since Julius Caesar was first staged in 1599 have generally tended towards more control and the production of a greater "naturalism.
9) Rehabilitating the Red Bull's reputation, in other words, does not necessitate that we ignore or erase the important differences between this theater and its rivals, but that we recognize and appreciate its unique contribution to the culture of playgoing in early modern London.
Dawson and Paul Yachnin, The Culture of Playgoing in Shakespeare's England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), Yachnin sees eroticism as part of the populuxe: "the experience of social masquerade was in general pleasurable for the Elizabethans, even erotically pleasurable" (61).
Oost meticulously captures the flavour of the theatrical experience of the period, reconstructing, with enthusiasm for minutiae and often-overlooked details, the aspirational desires behind mid-Victorian playgoing.
Sullivan's positing of a specifically mercantile playgoing sensibility is the book's most daring and innovative premise.
Culpeper does soften this claim briefly by noting the potential differences in "perceptual salience" between readers and playgoing spectators, but states that it is "not an area [he has] the space to develop within this book" although he will look to "eye-dialect" as suggested by "non-standard writing" (42).
This rich and provocative collection is shaped by the idea that early modern theater appealed to all five senses, not just to watching and listening (the one Renaissance studies tends to privilege), the emotional experience of playgoing "arising as much from the physical environment as from inscribed textual moments" (2).