playgoer

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playgoer

a person who goes to theatre performances, esp frequently
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Her first confirmed playgoing occurs at age three and a half,
One has to admire his time management" Author and historian Andrew Roberts "In 30 years of playgoing, I have slumbered through much of the best that British drama has to offer" Actor Michael Simkins Lord Hattersley, former deputy leader of the Labour Party, above "I was single.
When Oberon reflects upon Titania's place of domicile, moreover, locations of London playgoing come to the fore:
[...] [T]he panorama also served a much-needed alternative to the theatre in a period when playgoing was unthinkable to the 'serious' families of London.
While the quick Broadway turnaround of some play titles provokes eyerolls from many in the industry, it's not entirely clear the same fatigue will be felt by the playgoing audience at large--a crowd that likely doesn't see every Broadway show the way insiders do.
There must have been a thirsty market for these transcriptions, but how do they stand up as records of performance, souvenirs of playgoing, and aides de memoire for readers and imitators at their own homes?
The combination of fairy tale hopes and reality check in a notoriously problematic script, along with the best Helena in my playgoing experience, yielded a highly enjoyable and meaningful evening in the theatre, the high point of my 2009 playgoing.
(33) For Andrew Gurr's discussion of the social composition of audiences at the early modern playhouses, see Playgoing in Shakespeare's London (Cambridge, 2004), pp.
With regard to the reception of drama and the relation of the theater to society, culture, and the public sphere, early modern historicists have usually focused on playgoing and performance.
The Book of the Play is collectively interested in such "histories," in early modern drama in print and in manuscript, specifically with their alternate modes of production and reception as distinct from those we associate with playgoing. Published as part of the Massachusetts Studies in Early Modern Culture series and edited by Marta Straznicky, this collection considers how drama's social impact was directed not just by the playhouse but by agencies like the printing house as well.
Secondly, Kinney examines how the conditions of playing and playgoing both inspired and restricted Shakespeare; the obvious limitations of the bare stage are off set by the actors' use of gesture and the way in which costumes signified meaning: not only the role of the characters wearing them, but their social class as well.
Here he considers not the physical structures or the audiences (topics of his classic 1987 study Playgoing in Shakespeare's London) but the team: the company who built the audiences, acted the plays, and helped create the phenomenon of Shakespeare.