abundance

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abundance

1. Chem the extent to which an element or ion occurs in the earth's crust or some other specified environment: often expressed in parts per million or as a percentage
2. Physics the ratio of the number of atoms of a specific isotope in a mixture of isotopes of an element to the total number of atoms present: often expressed as a percentage
3. a call in solo whist undertaking to make nine tricks

abundance

The relative proportion of each element, or of each isotope of an element, found in a celestial object or structure. See cosmic abundance.

abundance

[ə′bən·dəns]
(geochemistry)
The relative amount of a given element among other elements.
(nucleonics)

Abundance

See also Fertility.
Amalthea’s
horn horn of Zeus’s nurse-goat which became a cornucopia. [Gk. Myth.: Walsh Classical, 19]
cornucopia
conical receptacle which symbolizes abundance. [Rom. Myth.: Kravitz, 65]
Copia
goddess of abundance. [Rom. Myth.: Kravitz, 65]
Cubbins, Bartholomew
head sports abundant supply of hats. [Children’s Lit.: The Five Hundred Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins]
Dagon
(Dāgan) fish-corn god symbolizing fertility and abundance. [Babyl. Myth.: Parrinder, 72; Jobes, 410]
Daikoku
god has inexhaustible sack of useful articles. [Jap. Myth.: LLEI, I: 325]
Dhisana
Vedic goddess of abundance. [Hinduism: Jobes, 439]
Doritis
epithet of Aphrodite, meaning “bountiful.” [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 25]
Goshen
Egyptian fertile land; salvation for Jacob’s family. [O.T.: Genesis 46:28]
land of milk and honey
land of fertility and abundance. [O.T.: Exodus 3:8, 33:3; Jeremiah 11:5]
Thanksgiving Day
American holiday celebrating abundant harvest; originally observed by Pilgrims (1621). [Am. Culture: NCE, 2726]
wheat ears, garland of
symbol of agricultural abundance and peace. [Western Folklore: Jobes, 374]
References in periodicals archive ?
human soul, so that the plentitude of divine love might find in the
I can think of no other word to describe a combination of plentitude, frugality, abundance, tightness.
Announcing the strategic partnership Ankit Rastogi said that 'this initiative will open plentitude of dimensions for IHR.
From rather different theoretical perspectives, both Josiane Paccaud-Huguet and Anne Mounic engage with and celebrate Mansfield's remarkable ability to voice a plentitude repressed by linguistic, soda] and sexual ordering.
Such a temperament is easily displayed in The Empire City--a modern comedie humaine written in common registers of language (declamations, slang, slogans, musical notations, and the poetic intimacies of speech)--making those originally separate books a lexicon used by selves discovering their plentitude and freedom.
Plentitude Comercio e Industria (Sao Paulo), Jos6 Figliolini, phone: 011-22067600, p.
If your taste in WWII firearms runs to the real thing, you'll find it there in plentitude, from 1911A1 .
Ted Toadvine is right in stressing that Merleau-Ponty's way of recasting Husserl's notions of intentionality and motivation is intended as an alternative to the Manichean ontology of plentitude versus void.
That story began with a plentitude of oil, and it will end
The speaker, by elegizing figures of suspended possibility (including the fallen hero and the child who died young), strives to achieve in human consciousness the angel's presumed plentitude of being.
He concluded that the enthralling fruitfulness of nature and God's infinite generosity in its plentitude is the center of its sacredness.
The organizers report that Burning Can attendees will enjoy a plentitude of canned craft beer, along with Live Music by Nashville's Bonepony, a Can Art exhibition, a Mechanical Bull, accompanied by Beer Can Chicken and other beer-infused dishes.