pleura


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Related to pleura: peritoneum, Cervical pleura

pleura

(plo͝or`ə), membranous lining of the upper body cavity and covering for the lungslungs,
elastic organs used for breathing in vertebrate animals, excluding most fish, which use gills, and a few amphibian species that respire through the skin. The word is sometimes applied to the respiratory apparatus of lower animals.
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. The pleura is a two-layered structure: the parietal pleura lines the walls of the chest cage and covers the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the pulmonary pleura, or visceral layer, tightly covers the surface of the lungs. The two layers, which are in fact one continuous sheet of tissue, are generally connected to each other. In humans, the pleural cavity is further separated into left and right sides by the heart and pericardial cavity. There is normally a slight amount of watery fluid within the pleural cavity that lubricates the pleural surfaces and allows the lungs to slide freely over the inner surface of the thoracic wall during breathing. When a lung collapses or develops an infection, a condition known as pleurisy can develop. The pleura becomes inflamed, and the pleural cavity becomes noticeably larger. Pleurisy can be extremely painful, but can be medically eradicated in many cases. Mesothelioma is a tumor of the pleura seen most frequently in asbestosasbestos,
common name for any of a variety of silicate minerals within the amphibole and serpentine groups that are fibrous in structure and more or less resistant to acid and fire.
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 workers.

Pleura

 

the serous membrane covering the lungs and the walls of the thoracic cavity in higher vertebrates, including man.

Mammals have a pulmonary pleura enveloping the lung, and a parietal pleura lining the inner surface of the thoracic cavity. Within the parietal pleura are the costal, diaphragmatic, and mediastinal pleurae. Between the pulmonary and parietal pleurae is a fissure, the pleural cavity, filled with a fluid that is continually renewed. This fluid is produced mainly by the pulmonary pleura and is absorbed chiefly by the costal part of the parietal pleura. The volume of fluid passing through the pleural cavity in 24 hours is approximately 27 percent of the volume of the blood plasma. The pleural fluid decreases friction between the pleurae during respiration. The sinuses—storage spaces that on inhalation partially fill like lungs and increase in volume—are located between the pleurae, in the inferior part of the pleural cavity. The pleura is supplied with blood from the intercostal, internal thoracic, and diaphragmatic arteries. It is innervated by the vagus, intercostal, and diaphragmatic nerves. Pain receptors are concentrated in the parietal pleura.

pleura

[plu̇r·ə]
(anatomy)
The serous membrane covering the lung and lining the thoracic cavity.

pleura

the thin transparent serous membrane enveloping the lungs and lining the walls of the thoracic cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
The treatment was considered as significantly effective if no pleural effusion flew out and only a small area of the pleura thickened or had mild costophrenic angle atresia and as effective if there was no large-area pleural effusion and the pleura was enclosed by effusion or had more serious thickening.
T3 lung tumors are tumors >5 cm and up to 7 cm or tumors involving parietal pleura (PL3), chest wall, phrenic nerve, parietal pericardium, or separate nodules in the same lobe as the primary tumor (Fig.
El tumor fibroso solitario de pleura (TFSP) es una patologia poco frecuente, corresponde a menos del 5% de los tumores primarios de pleura (1, 2).
Positive CT thorax was defined when there was concentric pleural thickening or nodular pleural thickening or pleural thickening more than 1cm and or involvement of mediastinal pleura (Figure 1).
Giant solitary fibrous tumors of the pleura are part of a broad class of fibroblastic lesions that can occur nearly anywhere in the body.
All forms of hematologic malignancy may involve the pleura, usually as secondary involvement from nodal, extranodal, or marrow-based disease.
Pleural effusions associated with malignancy, but without any direct involvement of tumour in the pleura are called paramalignant effusions.
It showed the metastatic tumors of left lung and pleura were shrunk at 1-month treatment and continued response to 14-month treatment on the last follow-up on March 9, 2018 [Figure 1]e and [Figure 1]f.
However, the disease may be reactivated at anytime and anywhere in the body leading to the clinically manifest EPTB.3,4 Lymph nodes, pleura, skin, gastrointestinal system, bones and joints are commonly affected by EPTB.1,5,6 Atypical presentation, diagnostic challenges, increasing prevalence and serious sequelae and complications necessitate an insight for timely recognition of EPTB.2,3 Unless diagnosis is set immediately and appropriate treatment is initiated, high rates of morbidity and mortality may be encountered.
Abnormal adherence or absence of the parietal and visceral pleura
By histopathology, the parietal and visceral pleura were expanded by a diffuse and severe inflammatory infiltrate composed of degenerate neutrophils associated with severe deposition of a fibrillary eosinophilic material (fibrin) (Figure 2A).