pleura

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Related to pleural: pleural effusion, pleural fluid

pleura

(plo͝or`ə), membranous lining of the upper body cavity and covering for the lungslungs,
elastic organs used for breathing in vertebrate animals, excluding most fish, which use gills, and a few amphibian species that respire through the skin. The word is sometimes applied to the respiratory apparatus of lower animals.
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. The pleura is a two-layered structure: the parietal pleura lines the walls of the chest cage and covers the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the pulmonary pleura, or visceral layer, tightly covers the surface of the lungs. The two layers, which are in fact one continuous sheet of tissue, are generally connected to each other. In humans, the pleural cavity is further separated into left and right sides by the heart and pericardial cavity. There is normally a slight amount of watery fluid within the pleural cavity that lubricates the pleural surfaces and allows the lungs to slide freely over the inner surface of the thoracic wall during breathing. When a lung collapses or develops an infection, a condition known as pleurisy can develop. The pleura becomes inflamed, and the pleural cavity becomes noticeably larger. Pleurisy can be extremely painful, but can be medically eradicated in many cases. Mesothelioma is a tumor of the pleura seen most frequently in asbestosasbestos,
common name for any of a variety of silicate minerals within the amphibole and serpentine groups that are fibrous in structure and more or less resistant to acid and fire. Chrysotile asbestos, a form of serpentine, is the chief commercial asbestos.
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 workers.

Pleura

 

the serous membrane covering the lungs and the walls of the thoracic cavity in higher vertebrates, including man.

Mammals have a pulmonary pleura enveloping the lung, and a parietal pleura lining the inner surface of the thoracic cavity. Within the parietal pleura are the costal, diaphragmatic, and mediastinal pleurae. Between the pulmonary and parietal pleurae is a fissure, the pleural cavity, filled with a fluid that is continually renewed. This fluid is produced mainly by the pulmonary pleura and is absorbed chiefly by the costal part of the parietal pleura. The volume of fluid passing through the pleural cavity in 24 hours is approximately 27 percent of the volume of the blood plasma. The pleural fluid decreases friction between the pleurae during respiration. The sinuses—storage spaces that on inhalation partially fill like lungs and increase in volume—are located between the pleurae, in the inferior part of the pleural cavity. The pleura is supplied with blood from the intercostal, internal thoracic, and diaphragmatic arteries. It is innervated by the vagus, intercostal, and diaphragmatic nerves. Pain receptors are concentrated in the parietal pleura.

pleura

[plu̇r·ə]
(anatomy)
The serous membrane covering the lung and lining the thoracic cavity.

pleura

the thin transparent serous membrane enveloping the lungs and lining the walls of the thoracic cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
A retrospective analysis was done of the 100 adult patients aged 20 to 80 years of age who presented with pleural effusion.
Besides being gold standard for pleural fluid localization, TUS has now a superior role for identification of pneumothoraces in a supine trauma patient or patients in intensive care unit, compared to conventional chest radiography4.
Objectives of the study was to compare the pleural fluid ADA level between tuberculous and non-tuberculous pleural effusion and to establish the diagnostic value of pleural fluid ADA level in tuberculous pleural effusion by using statistical methods.
White arrow shows ultrasonographic visualization of a pleural effusion between the visceral and parietal pleura
It has been suggested that higher levels of ADA in pleural fluid better predict the diagnosis of TB with a sensitivity of 90 to 100% and a specificity of 89 to 100% when using the Guisti method (6).
Fue valorada en aquel momento por neumologia quien considera estudios de liquido pleural para establecer etiologia del derrame pleural persistente, por sospecha de no ser netamente paraneumonico.
Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of closed pleural biopsy.
Patient was resumed on CAPD with 2L dialysate exchanges four times per day, without recurrence of pleural effusion for the subsequent 8 years of follow-up.
Diagnostic criteria for mesothelioma were (i) pleura CT scan findings highly suggestive for mesothelioma (diffuse and concentric pleural thickening), (ii) report of malignant mesothelioma on histopathological study, (iii) mesothelial hyperplasia on biopsy and (iv) immunohistochemical (IHC) staining.
However, in a set up like Pakistan, due to the higher cost and lack of availability of newer techniques, closed biopsy procedures remain the standard of management for the diagnosis of pleural effusions.
Supine positioning causes a layering pleural effusion to distribute posteriorly, causing hazy or veil-like opacification of the hemithorax with preservation of bronchovascular structures (Figure 4).
Patients may also present with dyspnea, nonpleuritic chest pain, and incidental pleural effusions.