pleural cavity

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Related to pleural space: mediastinum, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, thoracotomy

pleural cavity

[′plu̇r·əl ¦kav·əd·ē]
(anatomy)
The potential space included between the parietal and visceral layers of the pleura.
References in periodicals archive ?
In both primary and secondary spontaneous pneumothoraces, gas enters the pleural space during inspiration and exits during exhalation.
When air accumulates in the pleural spaces, the condition is called pneumothorax.
The reexpansion of the lung after the chest tube placement may have further obliterated the pleural space compressing the injured area.
Patients may use more hypertonic dialysis solution to increase ultrafiltration; however, that will lead to a further increase in the intraabdominal pressure and subsequently, increased flux of the dialysate into the pleural space causing worsening of symptoms.
Mesothelioma in the lung pleural is difficult to differentiate from other tumors in the lung pleura, such as primary lung adenocarcinoma protruding into the pleural space and metastatic adenocarcinoma from other tissues.
To our knowledge, this is the first case report of sarcoidosis presenting as eosinophilic pleural effusion, peripheral eosinophilia, pleural thickening, splenomegaly, moderate hepatomegaly and bronchiolitis obliterans and the second case reporting the presence of eosinophilia in the pleural space and in the blood.
It is secondary to rupture of subpleural lesions into the pleural space and was identified on CT scans in 39% of cases in one study (4).
Treatment of candidemia and the following Candida infections: intraabdominal abscesses, peritonitis, and pleural space infections; CANCIDAS has not been studied in endocarditis, osteomyelitis, or meningitis due to Candida
The pressure gradient is created by the negative pressure of the pleural space and the CSF pressure (>0 mmHg).
Abstract: Empyema necessitatis is a rare complication of empyema characterized by a spontaneous extension of pus from the pleural space into adjacent soft tissues.
The catheters, which are used to aspirate fluid from the lungs, may be brittle and can fragment in the patient's pleural space.
Two sources might account for PSA expression in pleural effusions: (a) plasma ultrafiltration and accumulation at an increased rate in the pleural space through the capillaries of inflamed pleura (plasma from patients with lung adenocarcinoma has been shown to be positive for PSA [7]), or (b) local secretion, mainly from enhanced production by neoplastic cells (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma tissues were recently found to contain the 33-kDa (free) form of PSA [8]).