curculio

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curculio

(kərkyo͞o`lēō), name applied to various weevilsweevil,
common name for certain beetles of the snout beetle family (Curculionidae), small, usually dull-colored, hard-bodied insects. The mouthparts of snout beetles are modified into down-curved snouts, or beaks, adapted for boring into plants; the jaws are at the end of the
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 (members of the snout beetle family, or Curculionidae), especially those that attack fruit. The term is sometimes limited to the acorn and nut weevils of the genus Curculio, characterized by extremely long beaks adapted for boring. The females, whose beaks may be twice as long as their bodies, lay their eggs in holes bored in the nuts. The larvae feed on the nuts, later pupating (see insectinsect,
invertebrate animal of the class Insecta of the phylum Arthropoda. Like other arthropods, an insect has a hard outer covering, or exoskeleton, a segmented body, and jointed legs. Adult insects typically have wings and are the only flying invertebrates.
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) in the soil. The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, is a serious pest of peach, plum, cherry, and apple, causing deformed and prematurely falling fruit. In spring the adults leave their winter shelter in piles of rubbish and fly to blossoming or early fruiting trees, where they feed for a week or more before mating. Eggs are laid in the fruit in slits made by the female, and the larvae feed for two to three weeks before pupating in the ground. Curculios are classified in the phylum ArthropodaArthropoda
[Gr.,=jointed feet], largest and most diverse animal phylum. The arthropods include crustaceans, insects, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions, and the extinct trilobites.
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, class Insecta, order Coleoptera, family Curculionidae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Twenty newly emerged, laboratory-reared fourth-instar larvae of plum curculio (~15-18 mg each), were introduced into each PVC pipe (plot).
Significant differences were recorded in the emergence of adult plum curculio from the different weed management treatments in the unmanaged peach orchard in 2007 ([F.
Although several insects were caught in the pitfall traps; we report those which have previously been shown to be important predators of plum curculio (Jenkins et al.
This research provides data from 3 yr of field studies combined with 2 greenhouse experiments, which together suggest that plum curculio adult emergence can be influenced by the type of weed management practice adopted in peach orchards.
The effects of orchard floor management practices on above and below ground arthropods, have been investigated in many agro-ecosystems (Altieri & Schmidt 1985; Russell 1989; Altieri & Letourneau 1982; Altieri 1992; Prokopy 1994; Hartwig & Ammon 2002; Tworkoski & Glenn 2008), however, very little is known about the response of the plum curculio and similar pests to orchard floor cultural practices.
The identification of a mechanism mediating reduced emergence of plum curculio in centipede grass was beyond the scope of this study.
Our expectation that weed free or bare soil (weed removed with herbicides) treatment, the most common orchard floor practice in the region, would be the most favorable to plum curculio emergence from the soil was supported by our data.
If, as expected, these arthropods should have a negative effect on plum curculio survival in the soil, then their numbers should be higher in treatments with reduced emergence of plum curculio and vice versa.
In summary, given that losses of insecticides used to control plum curculio through FQPA (1996) restrictions will continue, and that pest management systems will continue to become less reliant on broad spectrum insecticides, research on cultural pest management practices, such as manipulation of the orchard habitat reported in this study, will become more important.
Field evaluation of reduced insecticide spray programs for managing plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in Alabama peaches.
Ecology and management of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Alabama peaches.
Invertebrate predators and parasitoids of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Southeast.