pluripotent cell

pluripotent cell

[′plūr·ə‚pōt·ent ‚sel]
(embryology)
A cell capable of differentiating into most cell types found in an organism but not capable of forming a functional organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
A team of scientists, which includes 15 Australians as well as researchers from Canada, Netherlands and South Korea, have identified a new kid of stem cell, a type of pluripotent cell.
Although the AG (in line with the majority of Member States' legislation) did not consider that pluripotent HeS fell within this definition of an embryo (as such cells were not capable of developing into a complete human being), he did consider that their use was still excluded from patentability as "it is not possible to ignore the origin of this pluripotent cell.
Isolation of a pluripotent cell line from early mouse embryos cultured in medium conditioned by teratocarcinoma stem cells.
The egg cytoplasm would then help reprogram the altered nucleus directly to the epigenetic state of a pluripotent cell, bypassing entirely the totipotent state of a human embryo.
Under those conditions, one might in fact generate the cell with as great a potential as a pluripotent cell [capable of becoming many different, but not all, types of tissues] from a very mature cell.
These cell lines include one disease free pluripotent cell line and 24 others with individual mutations that give rise to several severe diseases such as cancer (breast cancer, Wilm's tumor and Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome), Huntington's disease, muscular dystrophy (including CMT, FSHD and Myotonic) and cystic fibrosis as well as some rarer genetic diseases such as Trisomy 5, macular dystrophy, incontinentia pigmenti, juvenile retinoschisis, alpha thalassemia and autosomal dominant torsion dystonia.
Two seeding methods were used to establish the pluripotent cell lines: intact blastocyst-stage embryos either were cultured directly on MEFs or were subjected to mechanical dissection under a microscope using pulled glass pipettes to separate the ICM from the TE prior to seeding.
Direct reprogramming (DR) has the potential to circumvent unsafe proliferative pluripotent cell stages and it allows in vivo procedures.
The way cloning works is that the DNA of a somatic cell is transplanted into an egg (germ-line) cell, whose own DNA has been removed to create a pluripotent cell.
com piece made it clear that those who refuse to sanction the killing of human embryos for their stem cells "have vigorously supported non-embryo-destructive methods of obtaining pluripotent cell.
had isolated a human pluripotent cell that can generate nearly every type of human blood cell when transplanted into the bone marrow of mice lacking an immune system.
The expression of pluripotent cell related genes such as oct-4 (Dyce et al.