plush

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plush

a. a fabric with a cut pile that is longer and softer than velvet
b. (as modifier): a plush chair

Plush

 

a woven pile fabric manufactured by a process similar to that used to make velvet. The pile of plush is longer (up to 6 mm) but not as thick as the pile of velvet. The pile may be cut or uncut. Different methods of manufacture and finishing result in smooth, embossed, or crushed plush. Plushes are used for trimming apparel, upholstering furniture, and making blankets and drapery.

plush

[pləsh]
(textiles)
Warp pile fabric with silk or wool pile longer than that of velvet.
References in periodicals archive ?
All you cute plushy bunnies and duckies are welcome in Easter baskets.
Honma was reported to be living with his girlfriend in a low-rent but plushy housing unit for ranking public servants, Mr.
Plushy, padded carpeting is always a plus when working the company's exhibit booth.
The University of Oregon football players are lucky to have such plushy quarters (Register-Guard, Aug.
As such, it often features in plushy business magazines such as Usbon's Africa Hole (Africa Today) that have gradually taken over from the once more radical Africanist media.
Despite the cost - and a feeling that it was wrong for farming's image for hard-up farmers to be seen in plushy London hotels - there will be calls for a return to the capital.
Says Morgen, "I won't sleep until every kid in this country has a Bob Evans plushy doll to cuddle up to at night.
She just had time to see her hands covered with plushy, alive fur gloves before her whole body crusted over and she was blazingly gathered into the single sound they made, the single mind.
A shank of lamb lunch over Paris, brandies by Madrid, a snooze at Marbella passed by 37,000 feet below - and a wake-up with a hot towel and coffee as the plushy Renault jet swooped into Morocco.
In any event, the trend is toward softer, more plushy interiors, and at the same time controlling costs by reducing processing steps.
Schnabel's use of velvet is the one witty and allusive feature of his work, a nose thumb at his plushy clientele and an acknowledgement of the crass structures of the art world he has so ingeniously internalized.
Pico, which, aside from coming in plushy form, is the largest supercomputer of his kind.