plutonian


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

plutonian

[plü′tō·nē·ən]
(geology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Threading would be hard to beat, but I think we'll be in the mix and Plutonian might have needed the run last time."
Breaths (1978); Plutonian Ode (1982); Collected Poems (1984); White
The late, great gay poet Allen Ginsberg channeled a ferocious anger and fear over nuclear proliferation into his 1978 epic poem "Plutonian Ode." Composer Philip Glass, who was a friend and East Village neighbor
In the May 24 NATURE, astronomers trounce another possible objection to a Plutonian association with the Kuiper belt--the body's large size relative to known belt members.
Although it's usually the eighth most distant planet from the sun, it switches places with Pluto for 20 years of each Plutonian orbit (248 years) to be the ninth, or most distant planet in our solar system.
The rocks are like "the dross of an iron-furnace," the mist is "gray and haggard," the vegetation "ungrateful," and the tangled thickets of nameless bushes "treacherously" mask deep fissures in the "Plutonian" rocks.
(5.) Vinkenoog's only other translation of Ginsberg's poetry that was published as a book is the bilingual Plutonian Ode/Plutonische Ode (Ginsberg 1980).
Rita Wong's Monkeypuzzle, her first collection of poems, mines the plutonian passages of the soul, paying exquisite attention to what works, what doesn't, and why.
Then came the "Plutonian Ode" (1978), one last plea to restore the power of mind and the respect for body to a civilization fixated on "Radioactive Nemesis." This is the poet that the morally scabrous Time could dismiss as "looking for his market share."
The ones high up can't be stable, because temperatures there are warm enough (by Plutonian standards) to vaporize those candidate organic aerosols.