plutonium-239


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plutonium-239

[plü′tō·nē·əm ¦tü‚thər·dē′nīn]
(nuclear physics)
A synthetic isotope chemically similar to uranium and neptunium; atomic number 94; made by bombardment of uranium-238 with slow neutrons in a nuclear reactor; used as nuclear reactor fuel and an ingredient for nuclear weapons.
References in periodicals archive ?
To return to the nuclear decay analogy, Plutonium-239 always has a half-life of a little more than 24,000 years.
These neutrons convert the depleted uranium into plutonium-239 (breeding), which is then fissioned (burned) to produce energy.
5 lb) of plutonium-239 a year by 2014, after which it could produce one atomic bomb per year.
Bomb: Codenamed Fat Man, it was made mainly of plutonium-239 and created a 21-kiloton blast.
A Congressional Research Service report on the threat pointed out that dirty bomb components are easier to detect than biological, chemical and even weapons-grade nuclear materials such as highly enriched uranium or plutonium-239.
The committee has drafted plans for consolidating and disposing of plutonium-239 and for disposing of uranium-233.
She presents a carefully researched and well-written travelogue that allows the reader to feel the atmosphere in what has become Europe's largest wildlife sanctuary, with wild boars and other endangered species living in the forests, fields and swamps, despite the contamination with cesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium-239.
A reactor core full of spent fuel may contain dozens of kilograms of U-235, and several kilograms of plutonium-239.
The half-life of Plutonium-239, as given in the Merck Index, is 24,110 years.
To create a repository that can safely contain deadly plutonium-239 (with a half-life of 24,000 years), one must find a geologic environment that has been stable for at least a quarter-million years.
From the early 1950s through the 1970s, some 150,000 tons of uranium, containing plutonium-239 and larger amounts of equally dangerous neptunium-237, were recycled from nuclear-weapons production reactors and processed at the three gaseous-diffusion plants.