pneumatic drill


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pneumatic drill

[nu̇′mad·ik ′dril]
(mechanical engineering)
Compressed-air drill worked by reciprocating piston, hammer action, or turbo drive.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pneumatic drill

A drill powered by compressed air from an auxiliary external source.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The standard SIMTAP kit contains a 1/2-inch pneumatic drill; carbide tipped cutters; a complete set of adapters; and assembly tools and a carrying case.
"A pneumatic drill, for example, reaches 110 decibels, which means that millions of Brits are listening to their music at a level of almost 40 per cent higher than is naturally safe.
So why not let them take a pneumatic drill into a corrugated iron shed and get on with it?
Moved forklift truck parked in front of steel container and broke padlock off container to gain access to land where thieves removed JCB breaker and attachments for pneumatic drill. Incident occurred at Storthes Hall student village, Storthes Hall Lane.
He insists on pontificating on the subject yet his knowledge of football could be written on a pinhead with a pneumatic drill.
The unit's updated design has made operation easier than ever, allowing the user to drive the system with a cordless, corded or pneumatic drill. The universal stem provides for both right side and left side connections for forward drive and reverse drive.
"Outdoor festival and concert sound levels can reach up to 130 db and beyond, the equivalent noise exposure of a jet plane taking off or a pneumatic drill.
Ladbroke had battled the original route, claiming it would be as noisy as being next to a pneumatic drill.
A mini-digger and a pneumatic drill were also used in the search, and a man could be seen drilling concrete in the yard.
He's bought a pneumatic drill and a ghetto-blaster.
According to a research presented at the 2009 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Annual Meeting and OTO EXPO, in San Diego, CA, cruising with the top down at speeds of 50-70mph (80-112km/h) exposes the ears to sound levels sometimes nearing those made by a pneumatic drill.