bacterial pneumonia

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bacterial pneumonia

[bak′tir·ē·əl nə′mō·nyə]
(medicine)
Consolidation of the lung caused by inflammatory exudation due to bacterial infection.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Smoking, alcoholism and certain chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or a suppressed immune system, increase your risk for pneumococcal pneumonia. In fact, for adults 65 and older living with COPD, the risk for contracting pneumococcal pneumonia is 7.7 times higher than their healthy counterparts, and those with asthma are at 5.9 times greater risk.
Pneumococcal pneumonia presenting with septic shock: host- and pathogen-related factors and outcomes.
Necrotizing pneumococcal pneumonia resulting in cavitation is more common than previously appreciated.
In Spain, mortality related to pneumococcal pneumonia varied from 7.4% to 13% dependending on the patient's age.
The majority of pneumococcal cases (93%) are due to severe pneumococcal pneumonia. Across all three countries, more deaths would be related to pneumococcal meningitis than to pneumococcal pneumonia.
He added that the results actually +pack a significantly greater wallop than is apparent at first look because rotavirus gastroenteritis and pneumococcal pneumonia in young children are seasonal diseases.
OVER 1 MILLION people in the United States were hospitalized, and more than 50,000 died, as a result of pneumococcal pneumonia in 2009 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2012).
PPV: Pneumococcal pneumonia streptococcus pneumoniae is a bacteria that causes a serious type of pneumonia.
To assess its effects on pneumonia rates and mortality in Pakistan regional studies on rates of pneumococcal pneumonia severity prognosis and outcomes are needed.
The observed trend likely represents a major decline in pneumococcal pneumonia, which should stimulate a reassessment of current causes and appropriate management of pneumonia in children.
Efficacy against nonbacteremic vaccine-type pneumococcal pneumonia was about 45%, while efficacy against vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease was about 75%, the reviewers wrote.
Determine the impact of attitudes and beliefs of patients on hemodialysis regarding the influenza, pneumococcal pneumonia, and hepatitis B virus vaccine.

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