podium

(redirected from podia)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

podium

1. a plinth that supports a colonnade or wall
2. a low wall surrounding the arena of an ancient amphitheatre
3. Zoology
a. the terminal part of a vertebrate limb
b. any footlike organ, such as the tube foot of a starfish

Podium

Any elevated platform; the high platform on which Roman temples were generally placed; a low step-like projection from a wall or building intended to form a raised platform for placing objects.

Podium

 

a high, usually rectangular platform with stairs on one side; the other three sides are sheer. Ancient temples, mainly Roman and Etruscan, were erected on podiums. In antiquity, the term “podium” also denoted the wall around an arena and the raised platform used for the seating of high-ranking spectators at circuses.

podium

[′pō·dē·əm]
(invertebrate zoology)
The terminal portion of a body wall appendage in certain echinoderms.

podium

1. In general, a raised platform for a speaker.
2. The high platform in an early Roman temple.
3. A socle projecting from the base of a building.
4. A low, step-like projection from the wall of a room or building that forms a raised platform on which objects can be displayed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The respiratory adaptations of the podia and ampullae of echinoids (Echinodermata).
For nominal stiffness (4), a posteriori statistical analysis by Tukey's Q revealed that slopes for ambital and oral podia were significantly different (P [less than] 0.
Individuals of Asterias rubens and Marthasterias glacialis use their podia in locomotion and anchorage, and to open the bivalve mollusks on which they feed (Lawrence, 1987).
Paine (1926), who studied the podia of Asterias vulgaris, concluded that 56% of podial attachment would be contributed by suction and the rest by adhesive secretions.
Data presented in this report support this second hypothesis: first, many epidermal secretory cells cover the entire apical surface of the disk; second, the footprints are completely (or almost completely) full of adhesive material; and third, podia may adhere strongly with only the margin of their disk (leaving crescent-shaped footprints).
Such cells have already been observed in the podia of paxillosid asteroids, which end not with a disk, but with a conical tip (Engster and Brown, 1972); in ophiuroid podia (Ball and Jangoux, 1990); and in the locomotory podia of several holothuroid species (Harrison, 1968; Flammang and Jangoux, 1992).
CS cells are remarkably similar in all echinoderm species whose podia have been examined.
These cells, like CS cells, are almost identical in the podia of all echinoderm species studied so far (Engster and Brown, 1972; Burke, 1980; McKenzie, 1987; Ball and Jangoux, 1990; Flammang et al.
A model for the adhesive mechanism of sea star podia
We consider the two types of NCS cells to be adhesive because they are the only secretory cells having extruded some of their secretory granules in attached podia.