poet


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poet

(sometimes when feminine), poetess
a person who writes poetry
References in classic literature ?
Those who have not a roof over their heads will be wetted to the skin," said the good old poet.
The breadth of the problem is great, for the poet is representative.
It makes him pre- eminently a modern poet--a poet of the self-pondering, perfectly educated, modern world, which, having come to the end of all direct and purely external experiences, must necessarily turn for its entertainment to the world within:--
I think the notion that no poet can form a correct estimate of his own writings is another.
said the First Poet, triumphantly, and endeavouring to devour his award broke all his teeth.
To be sure I had passed through what I may call a paroxysm of Alexander Smith, a poet deeply unknown to the present generation, but then acclaimed immortal by all the critics, and put with Shakespeare, who must be a good deal astonished from time to time in his Elysian quiet by the companionship thrust upon him.
But although he is a far better poet than Barbour, or even perhaps than James I, he is not for you so interesting in the meantime.
The poet blushed again, and said: "I do not think that can be the case, for my verses have never been printed.
The philosophy of this ancient poet appears to have been that of Horace.
Already as a boy, though normal and active, he began to be sensitive to the Divine Power in Nature which in his mature years he was to express with deeper sympathy than any poet before him.
Well, of course, there are poets and poets, poets sociable and poets very unsociable.
So have I heard thee say once before," answered the disciple, "and then thou addedst: 'But the poets lie too much.