poetaster


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poetaster

a writer of inferior verse
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For most of the attested coinages, the number of actual occurrences ranges between 1 and 10, but vasty, fairyland, plumpy, poetaster, might-have-been, and serendipity are used much more frequently.
All references are to Ben Jonson, Poetaster, in Ben Jonson, vol.
New York Times economic poetaster Paul Krugman said the small nation had been "hijacked by a combination of free-market ideology and crony capitalism.
A poetaster Zabihullah told Afghan Islamic Press (AIP) that people, who allegedly showed negligence into the attack, should also be put on trial.
4) While Eben, the New World poetaster, never exerts the richly ambivalent fascination of Don Quixote, despite the comic punishments he endures for his guilelessness, the source of his naivety--his Platonic self-regard--remains ambiguous in the quixotic sense.
Murdoch and Lodge's parody of literary-critical discourse has its antecedents dating back through M'Choakumchild in Dickens' Hard Times to the would-be poets in Ben Jonson's Poetaster (1601).
His epitaph hailed him as "a pattern of christian virtues, and a model of the pastoral character," and an anonymous poetaster spun 88 lines of doggerel in his honor, "Elegiac Stanzas.
Diverse narrative voices and perspectives tell different stories about politics, erotics, and poetics in such disorganized organization that some critics have even sought to dismiss the book as the clumsy work of a posthumous editor or a later poetaster.
Here and throughout the book his tone is both judicious and generous, with often a touch of humor (as when he says of Jonson's drama Poetaster that the "play has uncomplimentary things to say about lawyers, soldiers, and actors, as well as transparent lampoons of Marston and Dekker, so people were probably lining up to complain").
Thoreau was undoubtedly beneficial to his community through his temp work as "a Schoolmaster--a private Tutor, a Surveyor--a Gardener, a Farmer--a Painter, I mean a House Painter, a Carpenter, a Mason, a Day-Laborer, a Pencil-Maker, a Glass-paper Maker, a Writer, and sometimes a Poetaster.
In quick succession I've just watched (and heard) R S Thomas reading A Welsh Landscape, Ted Hughes reading from Crow, Sheenagh Pugh, Simon Armitage, Tony Curtis (all three of them, the film star, the Irish poetaster and the genuine Welsh original), Ifor Thomas and Lloyd Robson.