poetaster


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poetaster

a writer of inferior verse
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clearly tempers the critique, Naden holds "The Poetaster"--of
Poetisa, like a poetess in English, is tantamount poetaster for many speakers'.
For most of the attested coinages, the number of actual occurrences ranges between 1 and 10, but vasty, fairyland, plumpy, poetaster, might-have-been, and serendipity are used much more frequently.
(19.) All references are to Ben Jonson, Poetaster, in Ben Jonson, vol.
to drama; the special attack on Plautus; the use of Choerilus as the type of poetaster' (Wickham 1891:334-335).
In 1601, he offended the world at large by putting himself into his play The Poetaster as the poet Horace, beleaguered by nonentities, and he offended the government again--if Donaldson is right--by implying support for the earl of Essex, lately executed for treason.
Still today drawing on the essential details of the ancient libel are England's "anti-Zionist" versions of the ancient hailed, such as the versified eruption of Oxford poetaster Tom Paulin about alleged child murder by Israeli soldiers and the ten-minute play by Caryl Churchill entitled Seven Jewish Children--A Play for Gaza (2009).
New York Times economic poetaster Paul Krugman said the small nation had been "hijacked by a combination of free-market ideology and crony capitalism." Huffington Post columnist Iris Erlingsdottir blamed the late Milton Friedman (who had once praised 10th-century Iceland's approach to government) for failing to "take into account the predictably irrational character of human nature," and concluded, "It is time for the grownups to take over again."
A poetaster Zabihullah told Afghan Islamic Press (AIP) that people, who allegedly showed negligence into the attack, should also be put on trial.
If the choice is between delusions of grandeur and melancholy resignation, then the madness of Don Quixote might be wisdom after all.(4) While Eben, the New World poetaster, never exerts the richly ambivalent fascination of Don Quixote, despite the comic punishments he endures for his guilelessness, the source of his naivety--his Platonic self-regard--remains ambiguous in the quixotic sense.
Murdoch and Lodge's parody of literary-critical discourse has its antecedents dating back through M'Choakumchild in Dickens' Hard Times to the would-be poets in Ben Jonson's Poetaster (1601).