poetaster

(redirected from poetasters)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

poetaster

a writer of inferior verse
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A useful analogy for the impressionistic way the plays conjure up images of Nashe, Harvey, and others might be with Poetaster, where Jonson, eminently capable of translating Ovid from the original, chooses in one place to have Ovid quote himself in Marlowe's translation, apparently to suggest a connection between the Roman and a brilliant but morally problematic poet of Jonson's own day.
Jonson's self-staging as Horace in his Poetaster of 1601 now appears as a significant event, an assertive literary act that lies at the center of a late-Elizabethan debate over the proper function and bearing of the playwright.
Richard Burton, a British explorer who journeyed to northern Somalia in 1854 wrote, "The country teems with 'poets, poetasters, poetitoes, poetaccios': every man has his recognized position in literature as accurately defined as though he had been reviewed in a century of magazines--the fine ear of this people causing them to take the greatest pleasure in harmonious sounds and poetical expressions, whereas a false quantity or a prosaic phrase excites their violent indignation."
erudite medieval guild gowned poetasters poeticisms on poesy and the
Perhaps his quiet, careful, unaffected voice is drowned out by the loud personalities and politically driven poetasters seizing the microphone of our cultural moment to force their message or selves upon us.
(16) Yet this ship of verses must first pass between Scylla and Charybdis (III, 229-31), where one of Cervantes' poetasters, Lofraso, barely escapes being thrown overboard to the "fieras gargantas" (III, 246) of these classical monsters.
From this ignorance in some, and vanity in others, we see the monthly and diurnal publications abounding with ballads, odes, elegies, epitaphs, and allegories, the non-descript ephemera from the heated brains of self-important poetasters, all ushered into notice under the appellation of SONNET!
That poem and "The Resurrection at Cookham Churchyard"--fully realized achievements in a late modernist idiom--together make up a corpus that assure him a status as a first-rate "minor" poet, among a host of writers that Jonson would have scorned to call poetasters.
When Milton uses the word "libidinous" in The Reason of Church Government to describe poetasters, to take a well-known example, the term describes an overly powerful attachment to the erotic that not all humans share.
1736 of the Vatican Library, poetasters prevail over occasional poets truly inspired.
In The Reason of Church Government (1642) he says that "libidinous and ignorant Poetasters [...] lap up vitious principles in sweet pills" (CPW 1:818).