poetic

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poetic

, poetical
1. of or relating to poetry
2. characteristic of poetry, as in being elevated, sublime, etc.
3. characteristic of a poet
4. recounted in verse
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
In a word, we must be in that mood which, as nearly as possible, is the exact converse of the poetical. He must be blind indeed who does not perceive the radical and chasmal difference between the truthful and the poetical modes of inculcation.
I call him, and think him the noblest of poets, not because the impressions he produces are at all times the most profound-- not because the poetical excitement which he induces is at all times the most intense--but because it is at all times the most ethereal--in other words, the most elevating and most pure.
Love, on the contrary--Love--the true, the divine Eros--the Uranian as distinguished from the Diona~an Venus--is unquestionably the purest and truest of all poetical themes.
We shall reach, however, more immediately a distinct conception of what the true Poetry is, by mere reference to a few of the simple elements which induce in the Poet himself the poetical effect He recognizes the ambrosia which nourishes his soul in the bright orbs that shine in Heaven--in the volutes of the flower--in the clustering of low shrubberies--in the waving of the grain-fields--in the slanting of tall eastern trees -- in the blue distance of mountains -- in the grouping of clouds-- in the twinkling of half-hidden brooks--in the gleaming of silver rivers --in the repose of sequestered lakes--in the star-mirroring depths of lonely wells.
Zarathustra himself, while relating his experience with the fire-dog to his disciples, fails to get them interested in his narrative, and we also may be only too ready to turn over these pages under the impression that they are little more than a mere phantasy or poetical flight.
Do not rely, I said, on a probability derived from the analogy of painting; but let us examine further and see whether the faculty with which poetical imitation is concerned is good or bad.
When the cloth had been removed, grace said and their hands washed, Don Quixote earnestly pressed Don Lorenzo to repeat to him his verses for the poetical tournament, to which he replied, "Not to be like those poets who, when they are asked to recite their verses, refuse, and when they are not asked for them vomit them up, I will repeat my gloss, for which I do not expect any prize, having composed it merely as an exercise of ingenuity."
Winthrop, however, or its environs--for young men are, sometimes to be met with, strolling about near home--was their destination; and after another half mile of gradual ascent through large enclosures, where the ploughs at work, and the fresh made path spoke the farmer counteracting the sweets of poetical despondence, and meaning to have spring again, they gained the summit of the most considerable hill, which parted Uppercross and Winthrop, and soon commanded a full view of the latter, at the foot of the hill on the other side.
The volume is organized chronologically according to conference panel and encompasses a reasonably varied, yet coherent, range of topics: "The Theory and Practice of Transcription" (1985), "Editing Women Writers of the Renaissance" (1986), "Is Typography Textual?" (1988), "The New Historicism and the Editing of English Renaissance Texts" (1989), "Voices of Silence: Editing the Letters of Renaissance Women" (1990), and "Editing Manuscript Poetical Miscellanies" (1991).
His poetical works are Tilottamasambhab (1860), a narrative poem on the story of Sunda and Upasunda; Meghnadbadh (1861), his most important composition, an epic on the Ramayana theme; Brajangana (1861), a cycle of lyrics on the Radha-Krsna theme; and Birangana (1862), a set of 21 epistolary poems on the model of Ovid's Heroides.
In addition to the books mentioned Stedman wrote Poems, Lyrical and Idyllic (1860); Alice of Monmouth, An Idyll of the Great War, With Other Poems (1864); The Blameless Prince and Other Poems (1869); and The Poetical Works of Edmund Clarence Stedman (1873).
It seems to have been originated by Tisi degli Odassi (b 1450?) but was popularized by his pupil Teofilo Folengo, a Mantuan monk of noble family, who published a book entitled Liber macaronicorum, a poetical rhapsody made up of words of different languages and treating of " pleasant matters " (1520).