poetry


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Related to poetry: Poems

poetry.

For lyric poetry, see balladballad,
in literature and music, short, narrative poem or song usually relating a single, dramatic event. Two forms of the ballad are often distinguished—the folk ballad, dating from about the 12th cent., and the literary ballad, dating from the late 18th cent.
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; elegyelegy,
in Greek and Roman poetry, a poem written in elegiac verse (i.e., couplets consisting of a hexameter line followed by a pentameter line). The form dates back to 7th cent. B.C. in Greece and poets such as Archilochus, Mimnermus, and Tytraeus.
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; hymnhymn,
song of praise, devotion, or thanksgiving, especially of a religious character (see also cantata).

Early Christian hymnody consisted mainly of the Psalms and the great canticles Nunc dimittis, Magnificat, and Benedictus
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; lyriclyric,
in ancient Greece, a poem accompanied by a musical instrument, usually a lyre. Although the word is still often used to refer to the songlike quality in poetry, it is more generally used to refer to any short poem that expresses a personal emotion, be it a sonnet, ode,
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; odeode,
elaborate and stately lyric poem of some length. The ode dates back to the Greek choral songs that were sung and danced at public events and celebrations. The Greek odes of Pindar, which were modeled on the choral odes of Greek drama, were poems of praise or glorification.
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; pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
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; sonnetsonnet,
poem of 14 lines, usually in iambic pentameter, restricted to a definite rhyme scheme. There are two prominent types: the Italian, or Petrarchan, sonnet, composed of an octave and a sestet (rhyming abbaabba cdecde
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. For narrative poetry, see chansons de gestechansons de geste
[Fr.,=songs of deeds], a group of epic poems of medieval France written from the 11th through the 13th cent. Varying in length from 1,000 to 20,000 lines, assonanced or (in the 13th cent.
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; epicepic,
long, exalted narrative poem, usually on a serious subject, centered on a heroic figure. The earliest epics, known as primary, or original, epics, were shaped from the legends of an age when a nation was conquering and expanding; such is the foundation of the Babylonian
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; idylidyl
, short poem. The ancient idyls, especially those of Bion and Moschus, were intended as little selections in the style of such longer poems as elegies or epics. There are 10 famous idyls by the Greek Theocritus, and, since some of them dealt with pastoral or rural scenes,
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; romanceromance
[O.Fr.,=something written in the popular language, i.e., a Romance language]. The roman of the Middle Ages was a form of chivalric and romantic literature widely diffused throughout Europe from the 11th cent.
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. Dramatic poetry is incidentally treated in the articles drama, Westerndrama, Western,
plays produced in the Western world. This article discusses the development of Western drama in general; for further information see the various national literature articles.
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; and tragedytragedy,
form of drama that depicts the suffering of a heroic individual who is often overcome by the very obstacles he is struggling to remove. The protagonist may be brought low by a character flaw or, as Hegel stated, caught in a "collision of equally justified ethical aims.
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. See also articles on individual poets and on various national literatures. For technical discussions of poetry, see free versefree verse,
term loosely used for rhymed or unrhymed verse made free of conventional and traditional limitations and restrictions in regard to metrical structure. Cadence, especially that of common speech, is often substituted for regular metrical pattern.
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; pentameterpentameter
[Gr.,=measure of five], in prosody, a line to be scanned in five feet (see versification). The third line of Thomas Nashe's "Spring" is in pentameter: "Cold doth / not sting, / the pret / ty birds / do sing.
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; rhymerhyme
or rime,
the most prominent of the literary artifices used in versification. Although it was used in ancient East Asian poetry, rhyme was practically unknown to the ancient Greeks and Romans.
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; versificationversification,
principles of metrical practice in poetry. In different literatures poetic form is achieved in various ways; usually, however, a definite and predictable pattern is evident in the language.
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.

Poetry

See also Inspiration.
Bragi
god of verse. [Norse Myth.: Parrinder, 50]
Calliope Muse
of epic poetry. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 159]
Castalia Parnassian
fountain; endowed drinker with poetic creativity. [Gk. Myth.: LLEI, I: 325]
Daphnis
creator of bucolic poetry. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 75]
Erato
Muse of love lyrics. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 159]
Euterpe
Muse of lyric poetry. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 159]
Homer
legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey. [Gk. Lit.: Benét, 474]
Parnassus
mountains sacred to Muses; hence, abode of poetry. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 234]
Pleiade, The 16th
century poets sought to revitalize French literature. [Fr. Hist.: Benét, 795]
Sappho (c. 620–c. 565 B. C.)
lyric poet sometimes called the “tenth muse.” [Gk. Lit.: Benét, 896–897]
White Goddess,
the goddess of ancient fertility and the moon whose worship is claimed by Robert Graves to be the origin of poetry. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 1087]

poetry

1. literature in metrical form; verse
2. the art or craft of writing verse
www.bartleby.com/verse
www.bbc.co.uk/bbcfour/audiointerviews/professions
References in periodicals archive ?
"There's an awful lot of people involved in poetry and our dream is to bring everyone together to work on increasing the audience for it and to make sure we know what each other is up to.
The invention of the printing press in the 15th century brought poetry to the common man and with it day-to-day subjects.
The letters of nomination should provide support explaining how the nominee nurtured poetry as defined above.
Visual poetry of the Romantics seems to be two radically different periods with a different role of poetry and the figure of the poet in society.
Tweetspeak Poetry promotes simple ideas as well: employees reading poetry over a lunch break, people writing simple poetry to share with the whole office on a poetry wall or other communal space or maybe on Twitter, or just finding pre-existing poetry at work (in the way words are strung together in unexpected places).
Warid's poetry junction service is available for both Prepaid and Postpaid subscriber.
* Poetry resource display--set up a poetry resource display during Poetry Corner sessions and at other times
The next few organisations and websites are ones that may provide useful classroom resources to support your teaching of poetry, or to give you ideas on activities that you could alter or create anew.
Stone says, "Kids often read poetry collections again and again.
Culminating in a spectacular event, Poetry Parnassus aims to raise the profile of poetry in the Olympic year.
This event will give the Omani poets a chance to communicate with poets and experts from other countries to share experiences in the field of poetry.
Urdu poetry in particular can be seen as Pakistani, but originated in India, as a kin-language to Hindi, affected by Persian influences.