pointed arch


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Related to pointed arch: ribbed vault

pointed arch

Any arch with a point at its apex, characteristic of, but not confined to, Gothic architecture.
References in periodicals archive ?
The original aisles are separated by two series of three alternating pillars and columns, which support two series of six archs completely pointed arch (a seventh was added at the entrance after 1943 following an enlargement of the church after the falling of the northex).
Each side of the first two storeys and the cardinal sides of the fourth storey are pierced by a narrow Gothic pointed arch. The arches of the uppermost storey are further subdivided into smaller arches.
In these comments on the pointed arch in "The Nature of Gothic" from The Stones of Venice--and above all in the implication that the imperfection of the producer and the infinite novelty of the product are necessarily bound up together--we hear, I will argue, a distant anticipation of the neoscholastic inflection which was given to the English "culture and society" debate by some highly articulate and self-consciously modernist practitioners of the arts in the early and middle twentieth century.
Inside the library, entered through a pointed arch bordered by stone, there is silence, interrupted only by the shuffle of patrons along white marble floors.
Both are linked by a wooden arcade with the main entrance under a pointed arch. The chapels were built in 1870 by local architect T Talbot Bury, who combined the Victorian idea of Gothic with Venetian designs.
The same is true for the horizontal loom with treadle and the spinning wheel; stone castlery and the combining of pointed arch, ribbed vault, and flying buttress into Gothic structures; the gunpowder cannon; ships with added masts, sails, and a mariner's compass; presses, papers, and inks variously employed; and the mechanical clock, the appearance of which may "in the advance of Europe to the forefront of world technology [be viewed as] a decisive moment" (210).
The Gothic Revival style is identified by the steep pitched roof, small rose window, and pointed arch windows and doors.
So, too, at Cambridge, where Peterhouse Chapel and the Old Library at St John's show that there were still craftsmen who could manage a pointed arch or a bit of tracery.
Prayer Arch: This design, found in every Moslem prayer rug, usually consists of a rectangle that has its corners angled to form a pointed arch or "mihrab." The mihrab represents the doorway of the Sacred Mosque in Mecca.
The Cathedral is classed as one of the finest examples of Norman architecture in Europe and has what's believed to be the world's first structural pointed arch, while the Castle was home for years to the Prince Bishops who governed the "buffer zone" between England and Scotland from the late 11th Century until 1603.
Today, distinctive features of the Grade II-listed building include pointed arch doors and latticework bars over the glazing of three central windows.