pointed arch


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Related to pointed arch: ribbed vault

pointed arch

Any arch with a point at its apex, characteristic of, but not confined to, Gothic architecture.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Gothic pointed arch did survive for some time in some other buildings too, but not the spired towers.
It is a point already lightly hinted above: that the ever-new infinitude of the Gothic forms is the necessary obverse of our untranscendable finitude of vision, of the simple fact that the whole circle which may be produced by completing the two curves of a pointed arch is beyond our seeing, stretching as it would up into the heavens above us and down into the earth below.
The image mooted above of philosophy and theology as chiastically articulated upon each other in the manner of the two shanks of a pointed arch seems, then, to have a foundation in Aquinas's notion of reason illumined by the divine in a movement neither of the straight line nor of the circle, but combining both in the oblique.
But it's a fine thing is a pointed arch made of the striving branches of the living wood.
Warranty for the critic's confiscation of this term is to be found in the object of his study: beyond the pointed arch we are given, at the end of the novel, the rainbow--a strong neopagan image, no doubt, but bought at what cost?
The aesthetic and the structural are dialectically bound up together, innocent of all primacy: if the pointed arch "spoke" to the eye before it "acted," with the flying buttress it was the other way round (Holsinger 238).
Fran Berry once again showed why nobody rides the track better than him when he came from last to first to win the three-year-old handicap on Pointed Arch for John Oxx.
DETAILED: This George IV mahogany secretaire bookcase, has an upper section enclosed by a pair of pointed arch bar glazed doors below a moulded cornice.
No architectural feature is more gloriously Gothic than a pointed arch,' states one guide to the architectural style.
The head of the abbey, Abbot Suger, realised that a cross-ribbed vault and pointed arch would greatly enhance the use of natural light in the building; accordingly, the abbey's windows were designed to allow his choir to be 'flooded with a new light' and thus a new architectural style known as Gothic was born.
It was an attitude which coloured Victorian idealism and ushered in both the Pre-Raphaelites and the word of ``Gothic'' which covered a multitude of sins perpetuated by, amongst other people, the 19th century architect and designer A W N Pugin who claimed, rather vaguely, that ``the pointed arch was produced by the Catholic faith''.
Its cathedral pine furniture has Gothic pointed arch panelling on the doors, wooden tab closures, ring-pull handles and ball-and-steeple corner finials.