pointillism

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pointillism

(pwăn`təlĭz'əm): see postimpressionismpostimpressionism,
term coined by Roger Fry to refer to the work of a number of French painters active at the end of the 19th cent. who, although they developed their varied styles quite independently, were united in their rejection of impressionism.
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Pointillism

 

(1) In painting, one of the names for a method used by the neo-impressionists in which tiny points of color are methodically applied. A synonym is divisionism.

(2) In 20th-century music, a type of notation characterized by the prevalence of individual sounds-dots over melodic motifs or chords. It is encountered in works by A. von Webern, P. Boulez, K. Stockhausen, and other avant-garde composers. Pointillism often results in the destruction of the melodic line.

pointillism

the technique of painting elaborated from impressionism, in which dots of unmixed colour are juxtaposed on a white ground so that from a distance they fuse in the viewer's eye into appropriate intermediate tones
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References in periodicals archive ?
The pointillistic style represented a gentler period.
This is a work that can easily become just impressionistic washes of sound, but conductor Ilan Volkov meticulously focused on balance and dynamics (sometimes with a finger to his lips) to turn it into a tapestry of almost pointillistic delicacy.
Webern's "Kinderstuck" is a challenging pointillistic piece based on an easily-discerned 12-tone row.
2, for its part, is by turns pointillistic (in the first movement), clattery (in the second), and morose (in the third); in its final minutes there is a dialogue between surprisingly lyrical, even romantic passages and violently dissonant ones before the music finally fades away, whimperingly, to nothing.
Two other works by Hoyland favourites completed the programme: Maderna's cool, pointillistic Serenata per un Satellite, and movements from Stockhausen's Tierkreis, surprisingly conservative in their lyricism, and immaculately delivered by cellist Ulrich Heinen and pianist Malcolm Wilson.
In the first movement, "Fast," the pointillistic texture demands economy of movement, precise preparations and a clear understanding of how physical gestures correspond with the musical phrases.
Despite its linear texture, this is a difficult and demanding work of pure abstraction, pointillistic in its outlook and demanding an impeccable sense of time and structure to negotiate the fragmentary, syncopated, and continuously shifting rhythmic figures.
Ruders was present here to hear his Four Dances in One Movement, a pointillistic score of great refinement and with many-layered textures, and one which has the capacity to reflect backwards and forwards in time.
Typical of Berger's post-neoclassical style, the Quintet displays a more pointillistic use of musical space, with wide leaps of sevenths and ninths and an avoidance of intervals that may easily imply tonal centers.
Delicate woodwind touches underlined the often pointillistic nature of the score, which broods with a Hollywood-style sense of drama and also breathes some surprisingly Elgarian elements - perhaps not so surprising when you remember that Rachmaninov once played his own Third Piano Concerto in a programme which also included the Enigma Variations (and Mahler, no less, was the conductor).
The Preludes are at one and the same time simple yet dense, melodic yet pointillistic, sentimental yet hard-edged.
Often its scoring is glitteringly pointillistic, putting immense responsibility on the many solo instruments it highlights in passing, all brilliantly conveyed by the CBSO players under conductor Hans Graf's tight, clear beat.