pointillism

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pointillism

(pwăn`təlĭz'əm): see postimpressionismpostimpressionism,
term coined by Roger Fry to refer to the work of a number of French painters active at the end of the 19th cent. who, although they developed their varied styles quite independently, were united in their rejection of impressionism.
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Pointillism

 

(1) In painting, one of the names for a method used by the neo-impressionists in which tiny points of color are methodically applied. A synonym is divisionism.

(2) In 20th-century music, a type of notation characterized by the prevalence of individual sounds-dots over melodic motifs or chords. It is encountered in works by A. von Webern, P. Boulez, K. Stockhausen, and other avant-garde composers. Pointillism often results in the destruction of the melodic line.

pointillism

the technique of painting elaborated from impressionism, in which dots of unmixed colour are juxtaposed on a white ground so that from a distance they fuse in the viewer's eye into appropriate intermediate tones
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 1886, Seurat reshaped the dresses of several of the characters, notably enlarging the bustle of the foreground woman with the umbrella, and added pointillistic touches of colors throughout the canvas.
In a pointillistic painting, uniform areas such as the ocean or sky can be described with a limited color palette.
To rule out relational properties and changes as unreal would leave us with a type of history that is no more than an atomistic or pointillistic chronicle of events devoid of all reference to eras, movements, revolutions, wars, and even killings where there is a temporal interval between the shooting and the death of the victim.
220-1], pointillistic focus on the individual unit risks drawing attention away from the central task of economics, which is to explain how individual units interact in the whole economic cosmos.
So you just brush edge against edge, creating a brilliance for a second, very pointillistic, and yet it is more explicit than ever.
By making sure that the raters deal with only a single part of a given individual's life, and because of the intentionally pointillistic quality of the Q-sort evaluations, independent evaluation with a common metric is made possible.
Of course, following this image, the larger society is a pointillistic construction, with endless dots for the human rights group to challenge.
Readers of The Current of Romantic Passion may find it difficult to overlook its rather pointillistic organization into fifty-two small chapters, some bewilderingly cryptic.
1925 - ) French composer of extremely complex, pointillistic music.
Orozco-Strada was at his best in Ravel's Alborada del Gracioso, rhythmically vibrant, charged with adrenaline, and vividly pointillistic in its colourings.
Hunted" begins with a pointillistic tiptoeing figure in the low brass that gradually increases in intensity, assisted by unpredictable meters and rhythms.
The composer incorporated use of changing meters, modalism, pointillistic passages, archaic sounding harmonies, recitative, and vocal melismas in what Casella himself said alluded to "the fantastic style [of the poetry] made up of baroque heroism, buffoonish and familiar comedy, and eternally varied episodes" The music does indeed reflect these qualities in the poetic scenes from the Trecento.