poiseuille


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poiseuille

[pwä′zə·ē]
(fluid mechanics)
A unit of dynamic viscosity of a fluid in which there is a tangential force of 1 newton per square meter resisting the flow of two parallel layers past each other when their differential velocity is 1 meter per second per meter of separation; equal to 10 poise; used chiefly in France. Abbreviated Pl.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fundamental theories of diffusion, poiseuille (viscous) flow, Knudsen diffusion and surface diffusion are used.
When the ratio k is less than a value of 0.18, the critical value of Re is less than that of the Poiseuille flow of circular pipe ([Re.sub.c] = 2,000).
In this study, a microstructure model which combines Knudsen diffusion, molecular diffusion, and Poiseuille flow is adopted to account for mass transport through the membrane (Eqs.
The contribution of these airways toward airways resistance is explained by the Poiseuille's equation for laminar flow of gas or liquid in cylindrical tubes of different diameter.
In addition, D and [u.sub.max] are the height of microchannel and the maximum velocity of the Poiseuille flow, respectively.
Georgiou, "On Poiseuille flows of a Bingham plastic with pressure-dependent rheological parameters," Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics, vol.
In the classical hydrodynamic stability theory (see, e.g., [26, 27]), the base flow is obtained as a simple one-dimensional steady solution of the equations of motion (e.g., a plane Poiseuille flow is obtained as a steady one-dimensional solution of the Navier-Stokes equations).
Meendering, "Pick your poiseuille: normalizing the shear stimulus in studies of flow-mediated dilation," Journal of Applied Physiology, vol.
Later a full analytical solution of the forces that dominate particles in Poiseuille flow was provided by Ho and Leal [3].
Further, the IB-LBM has been applied to quantitative analyses of the motion and deformation of the RBC membrane in a Poiseuille flow and its compression during passage through a stenotic microvessel, with a focus on the cell-cell interaction strength [2,3,29].
Poiseuille's equation can be used to determine the pressure drop of a constant viscosity fluid exhibiting laminar flow through a rigid pipe.