poison hemlock


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poison hemlock,

lethally poisonous herbaceous plant (Conium maculatum) of the family Umbelliferae (parsleyparsley,
Mediterranean aromatic herb (Petroselinum crispum or Apium petroselinum) of the carrot family, cultivated since the days of the Romans for its foliage, used in cookery as a seasoning and garnish.
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 family). It has rank, finely divided foliage, flat-topped clusters of small white flowers, and a hollow, purple-mottled stem. Although native to the Old World, it is now naturalized and common in parts of the United States. The poisonous principle (the alkaloid coniine) causes paralysis, convulsions, and eventual death. Poison hemlock was used in ancient Greece in executions; a famous example was the philosopher Socrates. The related water hemlock (any species of Cicuta) is similar in appearance and as poisonous. C. maculata, called also musquash-root, spotted cowbane, and beaver poison, is the common species of E North America. The evergreen trees called hemlockhemlock,
any tree of the genus Tsuga, coniferous evergreens of the family Pinaceae (pine family) native to North America and Asia. The common hemlock of E North America is the eastern hemlock, T.
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 are unrelated. Poison hemlock is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales, family Umbelliferae.
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poison hemlock
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poison hemlock

poison hemlock

Poison Hemlock and Water Hemlock- one of the most poisonous plants, grows in moist areas near water, streams, ditches, swamps. White flower clusters in umbrella shape. Stems are smooth (no hair) and have purple splotches, sometimes covered with a white powder that rubs off easily. The leaves are sometimes mistaken for parsley. Smells bad and can grow up to 10 feet high.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz

poison hemlock

[′pȯiz·ən ′hem‚läk]
(botany)
Conium maculatum. A branching biennial poisonous herb that contains a volatile alkaloid, coniine, in its fruits and leaves.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
biosynthesis and biological effects of poison hemlock alkaloids.
which poison hemlock was only suspected as the most probable agent of
indirect consumption of poison hemlock, due to the consumption of birds
previously mentioned above, while poison hemlock is native to Europe and
However, 2 cases (6.7%) involved the taking of poison hemlock with the
in poison hemlock in smaller concentrations are the following:
([C.sub.8][H.sub.17]NO) is also found in poison hemlock in small
first isolated by Wolffenstein from poison hemlock [67].
Poison hemlock is closely related to various edible plants, including wild carrot (Daucus carota), so-called 'fool's parsley' (Aethusa cynapium), parsnip, caraway and fennel.
Gardner, 'Ingestion of Poison Hemlock [Conium maculatum], Alerts, Notices and Case Reports', WJM 163: 6 (Dec.
(103) Frank et al., 'Ingestion of Poison Hemlock', 573.
(117) Lopez et al., 'Biochemistry of Hemlock,' 842; Frank et al., 'Ingestion of Poison Hemlock', 573.