polar outbreak

polar outbreak

[′pō·lər ′au̇t‚brāk]
(meteorology)
The movement of a cold air mass from its source region; almost invariably applied to a vigorous equatorward thrust of cold polar air, a rapid equatorward movement of the polar front. Also known as cold-air outbreak.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The surface chart (next page, top right) shows a classic polar outbreak pattern, with an Alberta clipper sweeping northwest-to-southeast.
Caption: RIGHT: The surface map shows a classic polar outbreak with an Alberta Clipper.
He noted especially their presentation of the three-dimensional motions in a polar outbreak (1951) and the study of a large amplitude wave in the westerlies (1963).
It follows that when a Canadian polar outbreak is underway, we'll find the jet stream extending from western Canada into the central Great Plains and into the eastern United States.
Caption: LEFT: This Canadian polar outbreak brought blustery northwest winds and 14-degree temperatures as it moved through Minnesota.
The eastern trough pattern is directly associated with a fresh polar outbreak, so it's a good idea to be especially vigilant for unexpected IMC conditions when operating in the Great Lakes region.