polka


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polka,

ballroom dance for couples in 2/4 time. Originated by Bohemian peasants about 1830 from steps of the schottische and other dances, the polka by 1835 reached the drawing rooms of Prague, from which it spread to the capitals of Europe. The modern polka is a mere remnant of a much livelier, more complicated dance based on five to ten intricate figures in which the partners tossed their feet in the air while executing turns in close embrace, toe-heel steps, and other movements. Related dances include the galop and the mazurka.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Polka

 

a Czech folk dance. It is in 2/4 time and is performed by pairs in a circle. Lively and simple in form, it became popular in the early 19th century in Slovakia, Serbia, Hungary, and Austria. In the 1840’s it became popular throughout Europe as a ballroom dance. The genre of music associated with the polka was employed by B. Smetana, A. G. Rubinstein, M. A. Balaki-rev, S. V. Rachmaninoff, and other composers.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

polka

1. a 19th-century Bohemian dance with three steps and a hop, in fast duple time
2. a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Polka

(language)
An object-oriented parallel logic programming language, built on top of Parlog.

["Polka: A Parlog Object-Oriented Language", Andrew Davison, TR, Parlog Group, Imperial College, London 1988].
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
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