Pollyanna

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Pollyanna

the “glad child,” extraordinarily optimistic. [Children’s Lit.: Pollyanna]

Pollyanna

always finds something to be glad about. [Am. Lit.: Pollyanna; Am. Cinema: Pollyanna in Disney Films, 170–172]
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike his Pollyannaish paeans to the glories of individualism, in this essay Whitman confesses his concerns about the "appalling dangers of universal suffrage in the United States.
As fingernail-paring as the act can get, the neurotic, self-incriminating Shawn is preferable to the Pollyannaish one, who soothingly tells us that AoPeople can make a life, it seems, out of loveAuout of gardening, out of sex, friendship, the company of animals, the search for enlightenment, the enjoyment of beauty.
Candidates come to mind: imbecilic, moronic, catatonic, Pollyannaish, blind, incurious.
Climate change and oil depletion are far too serious for Pollyannaish flights from reality.
One need not be Pollyannaish about the power and reach of capitalism when advocating for multi-vocal, polysemous readings of commercial goods and related practices.
I don't really mean to be flippant here, or to suggest that Levine is Pollyannaish in his case for a Darwinian re-enchantment of the world.
While his approach, at times, comes across as a bit Pollyannaish because he places too much faith in therapy and too easily dismisses the effectiveness of medication, his view is much more realistic than the American Medical Association's current position, which relies heavily on drugs.
Raging Waters is neither self-aggrandizing nor Pollyannaish in praising Lutheran Disaster Relief and the many other faith-based humanitarian organizations that have supplemented and often surpassed governmental relief efforts.
Brickell's reluctance to engage these kinds of questions, all of them well framed in the now substantial literature on late Victorian same-sex culture, makes him seem slightly Pollyannaish, accentuating the capacity of New Zealand culture to accommodate same-sex relationships except, of course, when it doesn't, as in the few documented cases of violence against homosexuals he unearths.
Since studies reveal a steady downward economic trend over the past quarter of a century for single householders, it would be either short-sighted or Pollyannaish to provide only a short-term solution in the vague and unwarranted hope of a better future.