polybrominated biphenyl


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Related to polybrominated biphenyl: Polybrominated diphenyl ether

polybrominated biphenyl

or

PBB,

any of a group of organic compounds used as a fire retardant. In 1973 several thousand pounds of PBB were accidentally mixed with livestock feed that was later distributed to farms in W central Michigan. Some 1.5 million chickens, 30,000 cattle, 5,900 swine, and 1,470 sheep that became contaminated with PBB before the mistake was discovered had to be destroyed. Later studies indicated that PBB had spread through the food chain; in one test of a sample of Michigan's residents, 97% of those tested had traces of PBB in fat tissue. Affected cattle suffered loss of appetite and weight loss (often leading to death), decreased milk production, and increased miscarriages. Laboratory studies have linked PBB with liver cancer in rats and with low birth weight, liver damage, and weakened resistance to disease in human beings.
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Growth in girls exposed in utero and postnatally to polybrominated biphenyls and polychlorinated biphenyls.
In this article we present the concentrations of 4 PBDE, 1 polybrominated biphenyl (PBB), and 41 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, the latter for comparative purposes.
Health Assessment of Occupational Exposure to Polybrominated Biphenyl (PBB) and Polybrominated Biphenyl Oxide (PBBO).
RoHS prohibits European Union (EU) countries from importing electrical and electronic products containing more than agreed levels of lead, cadmium, mercury, hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants.
Commercial preparations contain few or no strictly coplanar PCB or polybrominated biphenyl congeners.
As per the RoHS directive Lightspace's current and future products will not contain more than the mandate levels of lead, cadmium, mercury, polybrominated biphenyl and (PBB) and polybrominated diphenyl (PBDE) flame retardants.
First, polybrominated biphenyl exposures have been associated with earlier menarche in girls, whereas experimental models show delayed puberty, a discordance that may be due to timing of exposure (Blanck et al.
This Directive bans the placing on the European Union market of new electrical and electronic equipment containing more than agreed levels of lead, cadmium, mercury, hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants.
Key words: PBB, PBDE, PCB, polybrominated biphenyl, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated biphenyl, retrospective time trend, serum.
Additionally, this nomenclature may be applicable to similar metabolites of other persistent aromatic organics, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs).
Often referred to as the "lead-free" directive, the Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive (RoHS) 2002/95/EC [1] restricts the use of hazardous materials [lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium (Chromium VI or Cr6+), polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) and PBDE (polybrominated diphenyl ether)] in the manufacture of various types of electronic and electrical equipment.