polygenetic


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polygenetic

[¦päl·i·jə′ned·ik]
(geology)
Resulting from more than one process of formation or derived from more than one source, or originating or developing at various places and times.
Consisting of more than one type of material, or having a heterogeneous composition. Also known as polygenic.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, given the presumed polygenetic cause of schizophrenia, a single gene like BDNF may only make a trivial contribution to the phenotype or it may require interaction with other genetic or environmental factors to manifest a phenotypic effect.
Because hypertension is a polygenetic disorder, innate sex differences in the genetic susceptibility to lead toxicity, in addition to sex hormone-mediated attenuation of other sex-related common determinants, may also be involved in developmental programming (Gilbert and Nijland 2008).
Tips' theory on a polygenetic mode of inheritance of asthma was further developed and suggested that asthma is a multifactorial trait in which multiple gene loci interact with one or more external factors (25).
Buried soils have probably a polygenetic character because clay coatings have been preserved in horizons [Ab.sub.1] and [Ab.sub.2].
(1985) reported the occurrence of salinisation process after a polygenetic succession ofilluviation, ferralitisation, hydromorphy, and plinthisation in a soil from basaltic parent material in Gomera Island.
The result is a much deeper appreciation of Kant's agenda: of his aim, for example, to refute polygenetic theories espoused in the popular philosophy of Christoph Meiners and others, or to explain human diversity as the result of a 'fortunate fall from wholeness' (p.
(68) The "monogenetic," normative origin of Anabaptism became controversial; and it was replaced by the idea of "polygenetic" origins.
Edzard uses evidence from The Thousand and One Nights and other sources to demonstrate a polygenetic origin of texts, based upon the detailed edition of Muhsin Mahdi.
Another unexpected example can be found in the evangelical support for Hume's supposedly irreligious views on causation.(167) Indeed, recent scholarship has pointed to the importance of British evangelical commitments to Enlightenment ideals.(168) Turned around, the Protestant use of Enlightenment thought also reveals an aspect of the polygenetic roots of fundamentalism, complete with its distinctive emphasis on the inerrancy of Scripture and the literal fulfilment of biblical prophecy.
It certainly cannot be ruled out a priori, that some of these characteristics may, actually, be of Germanic heritage, which may have permeated the Irish-Scottish style of art and may have given support to corresponding pre-existing tendencies there, thus causing a kind of polygenetic reinforcement.
Nott, for example, defended the South's slavery with a polygenetic explanation of humanity's creation rather than a religious defense such as that employed by John C.