polygyny


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Related to polygyny: Sororal Polygyny

polygyny

1. the practice or condition of being married to more than one wife at the same time
2. the practice in animals of a male mating with more than one female during one breeding season
3. the condition in flowers of having many carpels
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

polygyny

a form of plural marriage where a man has more than one wife. This is viewed as a strategy which allows powerful males to control reproductive resources and to tactically manipulate kin ties. Far more common than its opposite, POLYANDRY, it is a subclass of POLYGAMY.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Polygyny

 

the practice of having more than one wife; a form of marriage existing throughout history and found chiefly in patriarchies. In its late forms, polygyny was retained in the class society of certain Muslim peoples of the East as a privilege of the ruling classes. Polygamy, a less precise term, is sometimes used instead of polygyny.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Yearning for Zion raid was motivated by a conviction on the part of Texas lawmakers, law enforcement officials, and social service providers that the practice of polygyny constituted evidence of sexual abuse.
Both men and women seem to agree that polygyny is no longer compatible with modernity hence women celebrate this achievement.
These include: education, household wealth, employment, urban residence, religious affiliation, polygyny, number of children, age, age gap between women and their spouses and ethnicity.
The benefit of the selection of females for cultured pearl quality traits such as nacre weight and thickness has also been reported in another experiment using half-sib families produced by polyandry and polygyny mating designs (Ky et al.
Polygyny, male parental care, and sex ratio in song sparrows: an experimental study.
(6) Polygamy, or rather polygyny, has been practiced in Bountiful since the 1940s, but did not receive widespread coverage until journalists and activists began pushing the government to enforce Canada's antipolygamy laws during the 1990s (see Bramham 2008).
After all, his first criticism applies to both polyandry and polygyny. Whether a marriage consists of multiple male partners or multiple female partners, there is the possibility of sexual competition within the marriage.
(11) The Talmud in Kiddushin unequivocally states that: "A woman cannot be the wife of two [men]." (12) Our discussion of polygamy, then, is really all about polygyny, and while polygyny may have always been uncommon de facto, in the rabbinic tradition it was certainly recognized de jure.
Algeria legalized polygyny in 1984 on the basis of the Qur'anic verse stating that "a man can have up to four wives." Tunisia in 1956 (nearly 30 years before Algeria passed its legislation) banned the practice and legalized monogamy on the basis of the second half of the verse "provided he treats them perfectly equally." Tunisian legislators argued that although a man could give the same amount of money, a house of similar value, equally costly jewelry, etc., to his wives, he could not give them equal love.
Polygyny makes little sense in this regard, as it puts the husband at a disadvantage.
In particular, polygyny and later miniaturization of polygynous queens are considered as prerequisites for this scenario, as it is assumed for some Myrmica [7, 11, 12] and Acromyrmex [8].