polymorphous

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polymorphous

, polymorphic
1. (of a substance) exhibiting polymorphism
2. (of an animal or plant) displaying or undergoing polymorphism
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In it we can trace how he used his fetishistic relationship with Mary, a relationship mediated by ivory hair and tribal law, a relationship which under the pull of narcissism turns both partners into masculinized feminine objects, as a defense against and substitute for the embrace of a homoerotic desire which itself stemmed in part from the dangerous power of a feminine whose touch can "kill both you and her." It is in this edenic, polymorphously perverse, yet anxiety-laden desire that we should look for Hemingway's quarrel with what Spilka defines more vaguely as "androgyny."
Moreover, vampires love intensely, bisexually, and polymorphously: they kiss each other often.(29) But sexual intercourse is not an option: the supreme erotic experience is drinking blood.
For example, a bird may be identified polymorphously as a bird, by any number of different, disjunctive combinations of identifying features, e.g.:
The early modern stage, she maintains, gave audiences access to polymorphously perverse, "pre-symbolic modes of sexual activity" that existed prior to their "repressive" cultural inscriptions (42).
Virginia Woolf's texts also frequently combine component instincts into a representation of the female sexual body as polymorphously comprehending all pleasure zones, all the sensual possibilities fused into a moment of being.
The polymorphously perverse "Little Hans" of Freud's case study is unrecognizable to Hans the young man.
I will then proceed to interpret the novella's central character, Gewinner, as an icon of a polymorphously perverse sexual order which jeopardizes the stability of gender binaries: his costumes, night-prowlings and insatiable sexual appetite turn him into a vampiric creation, an image of marginal, transgressive homosexual desire.
Freud (1909; 1910b) uses the myth of Oedipus to describe how the polymorphously perverse sexual drive and the innate bisexuality of the infant are restrained, moulded and contorted into 'normal', genitally led heterosexuality.
It is through the process of play that the child acquires a sense of the bounded self that is differentiated from the plenitude of the "polymorphously perverse."
But I would add that they're more polymorphously perverse, as in, so what is a penis?
One problem is that all the participants, with the likely exception of the polymorphously libidinous Ian, really know better than to imagine any of these liaisons are advisable.