polyphonic

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polyphonic

Music composed of relatively independent melodic lines or parts; contrapuntal

polyphonic

The ability to play back some number of musical notes simultaneously. For example, 16-voice polyphony means a total of 16 notes, or waveforms, can be played concurrently.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this Bakhtinian moment, Frank suggests taking every Pushkin utterance to be polyphonically complete, formally finished, yet open-ended.
We are an amphitheater of malleable embodiments, polyphonically arranged, constantly drawing the blueprint of our bodies, not knowing if our bodies will obey or disobey our needs.
Medieval composers set this prayer and other liturgical texts on the Annunciation theme to music, both polyphonically and as sequences (see Robertson 1995).
The cycle sets the odd-numbered verses of the Magnificat text polyphonically, except for the first verse, which is divided into the initial monophonic intonation of the word "Magnificat," followed by a polyphonic response.
Polyphonically -- When it comes to reforming governance, as Jimmy Durante was known to say: "Everybody wants ta get in-ta de act.
Thus, rather than interpreting the picturesque as "a form of social control," I suggest that we acknowledge how this aesthetic plays polyphonically with tensions between originals and simulacra, tourists and guidebooks, and verbal descriptions and actual sites.
1) The wailing continued, polyphonically wrapping itself around the mourners and those who stayed in their houses, waiting to hear of the death, sung by men to the community through the Ancestral Law.
Since this theory determines very little about the organization of these musical structures (sequentially, polyphonically, or by any other musical parameter), very few details of a composition's musical surface (i.
A part from the Ordinary of the Mass, the Magnificat, as a prominent component of the Office of Vespers, provided the liturgical text most often set polyphonically by Renaissance composers.
In the union of perspectives arrayed, of voices that unite, of planes that geometrically and polyphonically balance themselves, Osman Lins, weaver, musician, and geometer, of the same stock of those who "spin and weave, join and order dispersed materials that otherwise would be useless or nearly so," went to look for the elements for that second creation of the world which makes itself into the word and which the word makes.
The sound of one solo clarinet is more compelling, and for me has greater impact, than the sound of four clarinets playing the same note or playing polyphonically at the same time.
It was also on these days that the vespers psalms were sung polyphonically by two choirs placed in the large pulpit (popularly known as the bigonzo or `tub') situated outside the iconostasis.