polyvalent

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polyvalent

[¦päl·i′vā·lənt]
(chemistry)
Pertaining to an ion with more than one valency, such as the sulfate ion, SO42-. Also known as multivalent; polygen.
(immunology)
Of antigens, having many combining sites or determinants.
Pertaining to vaccines composed of mixtures of different organisms, and to the resulting mixed antiserum.
References in periodicals archive ?
To Wagschal the variety or polyvalency of jealousy is precisely what makes it so open to association with other ideological phenomena, "in which rhetoric is intricately linked to issues of race, class, gender, morality, epigemology, and aesthetics" (189).
Writing after, with and against commentators including Arjun Appadurai, Don Kulick, Gilbert Herdt (and, perhaps most interestingly, JK Gibson-Graham), the editors address the polyvalency and contingency of the term 'gay', its meaning(s) within a perceived phenomenon of globalisation, and the possibility of gay or Lavender English as a site for ethnographic research.
The poetic use of the childlike is thus an attempt to return to what has been taken away: "through melody, rhythm, semantic polyvalency, the so-called poetic form, which decomposes and recomposes signs, is the sole 'container' seemingly able to secure an uncertain but adequate hold over the Thing" (14).
Gerald Kennedy has noted, "By splitting a potentially single narrative into two stories, Anderson accentuates the solipsistic quality of his characters' lives." (32) Splitting the "potentially single narrative" also accentuates the polyvalency of Kate Swift's body by separating the different "readings" of it; only briefly do Hartman's and George's readings come into the same fictional space.
Addressing in his recent book, Victorian Relativity: Radical Thought and Scientific Discovery, the "semi-misnoma" of postmodernism and its legacy in "polyvalency, indeterminacy, constructivism, differance, and the ideological critique of knowledge," Christopher Herbert considers it a "mistake," an "amnesiac tendency," to suppose that the postmodern condition has been singularly shaped by writers such as Saussure and Nietzsche.
Yet Jeannet's linking of life with work and thence to works yields a strong sense of multiple-stranded continuance, continuous thematic alternations, and polyvalency, which are signature Calvinian concerns.
Insights into the diverse contextuality of the biblical text and into its consequent polyvalency on the one hand, and into the diverse contextuality of the recipients and their consequent multiplicity of perspectives on the other, call for two things:
Nancy Wright explores another polyvalency -- court and City -- through competitive festival and display, and Barbara Lewalski, in a solid and satisfying contribution, examines Milton's Comus as "in every respect a reformed masque" (315).
She utilizes the concept of "dual signification" and argues for polyvalency, that a single image may evoke divergent fields of meaning for Aboriginal makers and Euro-western consumers.
The influence of polyvalency on the binding properties of antibodies.
Focusing on the piano quintet version of La creation du monde, rather than the original ballet, she scrutinizes Milhaud's application of jazz principles, in particular the blues third and seventh, which Drake describes as 'inflectional polyvalency', on both local and background levels, also drawing parallels between the fugal entries and the formula for the jazz riff.
One of the things which becomes apparent from this consideration of the ascription and invocation of sasi is its polyvalency; a feature which is effected by the way in which the meanings of sasi are combined and recombined, not only in different contexts, by different actors, and in relation to different agendas, but also within any one given context.