pondok

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pondok

, pondokkie
(in southern Africa) a crudely made house built of tin sheet, reeds, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The people who live in these pondoks on the Cape Flats--structures every bit as flimsy and useless against the elements as the one Boesman built--can't single out the white man as the source of their rubbish anymore, but, in essence, the refrain is the same: They live in a world made out of rubbish, they are the rubbish of that world.
Boesman and Lena was my first deep journey into the world of the pondok, a world that had fascinated me from my childhood when I used to accompany my mom to a butcher in a humble little Colored settlement on the outskirts of Port Elizabeth to buy black-market meat for our boarding house during the strictly rationed years of the Second World War.
This can be illustrated by the case of a local Imam who was educated in a traditional pondok in Patani, and whose younger brother became a Maulana and close affiliate of group leaders from South Asia.
The Thai Ministry of Education has registered 214 Islamic schools but acknowledges that there are hundreds of small, unregistered, privately-owned pondoks.
Whenever there was a threat from PAS, UMNO utilised the rural Ulama of the Pondok institutions4 to secure the support of the Muslims.
The Ulama exert influence especially as religious teachers in Pondok schools and in the communities they serve (neighbourhoods, villages, municipalities, universities, think tanks).
I spent nearly the whole fucking day walking that Swartkops bush trying to find the pondok where she lived or somebody that knew her.
If you were sitting there with me now like we are sitting now in this pondok you would have seen me shaking my head because that is what I was doing staring at those lights blinking on and off.
In this category of terrorist incubators are the Pondok al-Mukmin in Ngruki, Sukohardjo in Solo (Surakarta), Mutaqin in Jabarah, Dar us-Syahadah in Boyolali, all in Central Java; al-Islam in Lamongan, East Java; and the Hidayatullah network in East Kalimantan and Sulawesi.
Sources believe that there could be several hundred to 1,000 pondoks in the south.
The numbers of pondoks, students, and teachers are unknown; however, some sources believe that there are several hundred pondoks in the south.
By providing a radical reading of the Qu'ran and cloaking political issues in extremist terminology, such pondoks and madrasahs made students receptive to the teachings of Salafi and Wahabi scholars, who had provided religious backing to Al-Qaeda.