poorhouse


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poorhouse

(formerly) a publicly maintained institution offering accommodation to the poor

poorhouse

A building, often supported by a community or by a religious organization, that provide housing and minimal services for the indigent; also See almshouse and bettering house.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, she writes, "the revolt against welfare rights birthed the digital poorhouse."
He added: "She says she is committed to the Northern Powerhouse, but it's more like a Northern Poorhouse.
Our objective is to provide insight into lives of the poorhouse residents by exploring the connections between dietary variability, disease, and medieval society.
When Kirch Gruppe collapsed in 2002, the liquidators sold RM Arts and Music to Arthaus Musik, while Moritz went on to create Poorhouse International, a London-registered Munich-based company a year later.
The state highway department, known as PennDOT, received reports of bones in what appeared to be an impromptu burial site beneath a broad meadow that had once been the site of a poorhouse, said Bob Rescorla, a PennDOT inspector at the site.
The uneducated and meager-minded man who is destitute is a continuing cost-burden to society; and it is a poor order of intellect which can look upon the poorhouse as a desirable haven for old age.
I continually bail them out of jail and send them off to rehab, but nothing works, and I'm destined for the poorhouse. Why is God punishing me this way?
Not quite the poorhouse, though, but a new report claimed that the British royal's wealth is "crumbling," and her household finances are already at a "historic low" with only [pounds sterling]1 million [AUD1.9 million] left in reserve.
Their daddy is, of course, in the poorhouse, but better to be in the poorhouse with my dogs than anywhere else without them.
It's made by the same production company, Wall To Wall, and it will follow five celebs - including actors Felicity Kendall and Brian Cox - whose ancestors were unfortunate enough to end up in a Victorian workhouse, or poorhouse as they were more accurately called in Scotland.
Scottish actor Brian Cox, pictured, is told of his great-grandfather's life in Glasgow, where bouts of ill-health forced him to register at the poorhouse in order to receive healthcare.
The old Elizabethan Poor Law stipulated that no one should be allowed to starve to death and that the poor must be given their daily bread, and it required each parish to provide a poorhouse to shelter the homeless.