popinjay


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popinjay

1. an archaic word for parrot
2. the figure of a parrot used as a target
References in periodicals archive ?
The Daily Mail has called him an "egotistical preening popinjay (who) has shamelessly put his anti-Brexit bias before the national interest - and is a disgrace to his office", while the Daily Express accused Mr Bercow of "flouting rules to thwart Brexit".
Speaking on the occasion, Popinjay Founder Saba Gul said, 'We are so hungry to find an investment that we don't seek the highest quality investor, which can disable us from future funding.'
Saba helps underprivileged and unskilled women get employment through her venture Popinjay. She has worked on low-cost solar lightening systems in Sri Lanka and taught entrepreneurship in the universities of Africa, whereas Haseeb is an engineer and founder of a number of successful startups.
Just as he admonishes the professional gentleman not to be the "fop, the dandy, the coxcomb, the popinjay," the writing is not showy, and the advice is practical.
(22) These lines are actually from a modernised edition of Lindsay's works published in Edinburgh in 1720; and Ramsay's familiarity with Lyndsay is clear from the epigraph to the second volume of The Ever Green, which cites his 'The Complaynte and Testament of a Popinjay' in the original sixteenth-century Scots.
Within a few hours, Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson had denounced Khan as "a puffed-up pompous popinjay".
Attacking Mr Khan, he said: "We will not allow US-UK relations to be endangered by some puffed-up pompous popinjay".
He even got in an extra jab at Khan, calling him a "puffed up pompous popinjay."
He is that type of popinjay who every now and again pops up." Actor Mark Gatiss "Waiting for the vet, who is coming to cut toenails of five dogs and a parrot.
An Extravaganza" (1839) (Poe 1975: 736-742), the "grinning," "audacious" and sinister-looking principle of Evil is intruding upon the peaceful valley which is perfectly tuned to the cosmic rhythms; the Devil's work--ruin of the burgers' careful observance of the natural rhythms--is anticipated and suggested by his gait: "But what mainly occasioned a righteous indignation was, that the scoundrelly popinjay, while he cut a fandango here, and a whirlygig there, did not seem to have the remotest idea in the world of such a thing as keeping the time in his steps." (Poe 1975: 740)
Also having fun, and singing very well in the doing so, were Nicola Alaimo as a Falstaffian Belcore, who ignored as best he could Sher's misconceived risor-gimento business, and especially Erwin Schrott as a most atypical Dulcamara--a preening popinjay who seemed forever in search of a mirror.