poplar


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Poplar,

former metropolitan borough, SE England. See Tower HamletsTower Hamlets,
inner borough (1991 pop. 153,500), of Greater London, SE England. Tower Hamlets was formed in 1965 by the merger of the metropolitan boroughs of Bethnal Green, Poplar, and Stepney.
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poplar:

see willowwillow,
common name for some members of the Salicaceae, a family of deciduous trees and shrubs of worldwide distribution, especially abundant from north temperate to arctic areas.
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poplar

poplar

This tree grows almost everywhere, up to 90 ft. tall (30m). When sticky little yellow-brown flower buds start popping out on the tree, (look like rice) take the bud, grind it up into a powder, mix into water and drink. It contains all the vitamins and minerals your body needs. If you feel depleted or like your body is lacking something, take this, it makes a really good nutritional supplement. Bud tea used for cough and lung problems. Bud preparations are used for everything from hemorrhoids to headaches. Inner bark tea used for vitamins, cleaning blood and overall health. Peel off the outer bark, revealing the lightcolored slimy inner bark. Eat it raw or slice it into thin strips and eat it like pasta when boiled in water. FOR PARASITES- take the inner bark, cut it into small pieces, dry it, grind it into a powder, and take it with a bit of fat, oil or butter and swallow. This shakes up the parasites so much you might see worms coming out of your butt alive. It's toxic to the worms but not to humans. The poplar/ aspen tree is considered a weed tree. It is so resilient, if you cut down the tree, another one will grow out of the stump. If you take a branch and stick it into the ground, it will grow a tree !

poplar

[′päp·lər]
(botany)
Any tree of the genus Populus, family Salicaceae, marked by simple, alternate leaves, scaly buds, bitter bark, and flowers and fruits in catkins.

yellow poplar, poplar

A moderately low-density, even-textured hardwood of the central and southern US; color varies from white to yellow, tan, or greenish brown; used for veneer, plywood, and lumber core for cabinetwork.

poplar

1. any tree of the salicaceous genus Populus, of N temperate regions, having triangular leaves, flowers borne in catkins, and light soft wood
2. any of various trees resembling the true poplars, such as the tulip tree
3. the wood of any of these trees

Poplar

Morris, 1978. A blend of LISP with SNOBOL4 pattern matching and APL-like postfix syntax. Implicit iteration over lists, sorting primitive. "Experience with an Applicative String-Processing Language", J.H. Morris et al, 7th POPL, ACM 1980, pp.32-46.
References in classic literature ?
Why does the Lombardy poplar hold its branches straight up in the air like that, when all the other poplars hold theirs out or hang them down?
So he hid it under the boughs of the sleeping poplar tree.
Mercury asked all the trees if they had seen the pot of gold, and the elm, oak and pine pointed to the poplar and said,
Although poplars had been brought from Europe to ornament the grounds, and willows and other trees were gradually springing up nigh the dwelling, yet many a pile of snow betrayed the presence of the stump of a pine; and even, in one or two instances, unsightly remnants of trees that had been partly destroyed by fire were seen rearing their black, glistening columns twenty or thirty feet above the pure white of the snow, These, which in the language of the country are termed stubs, abounded in the open fields adjacent to the village, and were accompanied, occasionally, by the ruin of a pine or a hemlock that had been stripped of its bark, and which waved in melancholy grandeur its naked limbs to the blast, a skeleton of its former glory.
The shores were in some places high and rocky, with low marshy islands at their feet, subject to inundation, and covered with willows, poplars, and other trees that love an alluvial soil.
I say, we fought under the poplars, both Abbots and all the monks, and one laid open my forehead to the bone.
The afternoon was already deepening into evening, and the titanic shadows of the poplars lengthened over a third of the landscape.
The poplars grew so close against the fence that they had some difficulty in slipping past them, and beyond the poplars they could see only a high hedge of laurel, green and lustrous in the level sun.
Surely the long straight rows of stately poplars that divide the beautiful landscape like the squares of a checker-board are set with line and plummet, and their uniform height determined with a spirit level.
He was all eyes as the train sped through the country; he adored the sand dunes, their colour seemed to him more lovely than anything he had ever seen; and he was enchanted with the canals and the long lines of poplars.
And in the yard was a brave bonfire with two gay little figures dancing around it, one of which gave an unearthly yell as the buggy turned in under the poplars.
With his thick knotted arms, his thundering voice, and his bristle of red hair, there was something so repellent in the man that the three brothers flew back at the very glare of him; and the two rows of white monks strained away from him like poplars in a tempest.