population III

population III

A hypothetical population of supermassive stars that could have existed before the galaxies formed. They could have produced the large helium content of the Universe and the microwave background radiation, both usually attributed to the early stages of the Big Bang. If population III stars did exist, cosmologists would need to severely modify current forms of the Big Bang theory.

population III

[‚päp·yə′lā·shən ′thrē]
(astronomy)
A class of stars that condensed from the gas formed in the nucleosynthesis of the big bang, and consist entirely of hydrogen and helium.
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These first-generation stars, called Population III, would have been responsible for churning out the heavier elements that shaped the evolution of second-generation stars and the galaxies they lived in.
Stars typical of the first stellar generation, known as Population III stars, are prime candidates as the source of all that energy.
Scientist Luigi Piro, the director of research at the Institute for Space Astrophysics said that one of the great challenges of modern astrophysics has been the quest to identify the first generation of stars to form in the universe, which they refer to as Population III stars.
Papers address high-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores, the binarity of Eta Carinae, metallicity-dependent Wolf-Rayet winds, and an overview of cosmic infrared background and Population III, among other topics.
The book concludes with the wider cosmological implications, including Population III stars, Lyman break galaxies, and gamma-ray bursts, for each of which massive stars are believed to play a crucial role.
360 Heads of the secondary schools were taken as population III of the study.
Population III was the intermating population N79-1500, which was formed by mating N69-2774 to six high-yielding cultivars or breeding lines that were highly adapted to the Southern USA (Burton and Brim, 1981).
The process of reionization analyzes simple analytical considerations and compares existing observations, while a further chapter describes some of the issues regarding the transition from Population III to Population II stars, as well as the constraints that can be derived from WMAP.
Over the past decade, a new type of star has emerged at the forefront of stellar astrophysics: Population III.
The simulations focused on the first Population III stars: massive, hot stars thought to have formed a mere several hundred million years after the Big Bang.
Another 34 poster papers are included on topics that include using stellar photospheres as chronometers for studying disk evolution, the Canis Major over-density, and the impact of cosmic rays on Population III star formation.
The team says that if dark stars existed, they could have altered the chemistry of the early universe by delaying the birth of "normal" first-generation stars--called Population III stars--by up to a billion years.

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