porbeagle


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porbeagle:

see makomako
, heavy-bodied, fast-swimming shark, genus Isurus, highly prized as a game fish. Also known as the sharp-nosed mackerel shark, it is a member of the mackerel shark family, which also includes the white shark and the porbeagle.
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porbeagle

any of several voracious sharks of the genus Lamna, esp L. nasus, of northern seas: family Isuridae
References in periodicals archive ?
lt;B A porbeagle shark similar to the one hooked by Mark and Simon
Councillor George Dunning, Leader of Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, said: "We believe it is a porbeagle three to four foot male, and that it may have been hit by a ship or boat.
Prebomb levels were similar to those in the porbeagle record, with values as low as -110.
The porbeagle shark, which eats mainly mackerel and herring, is relatively rare in British waters.
Scott MacNichol, 30, was shaken up but uninjured after a porbeagle shark apparently mistook his camera equipment for food.
25pm) Co-presenter Rhys Llywelyn and Julian Lewis Jones travel from Milford Haven in search of the porbeagle and the fierce blue shark, hoping to catch a specimen of the species.
The 15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) concluded without providing any trade protections whatsoever for severely depleted Atlantic bluefin tuna and four vulnerable species of sharks - scalloped hammerhead, oceanic white tip, porbeagle and spiny dogfish.
Japan, however, is likely to seek the reversal of a decision to extend Appendix II status to the porbeagle, the only one of four sharks up for review to gain Cites protection.
However, the UN wildlife meeting has rejected efforts to regulate the trade in overfished porbeagle sharks, reversing an earlier ruling at the conference and leaving none of the proposed shark species with protection.
During these two weeks, the countries will decide on the inclusion of eight shark species (oceanic whitetip, dusky, sandbar, spurdog, porbeagle and scalloped, smooth and great hammerheads) in CITES Appendix II.
Scientists are also set to meet in Denmark to issue recommendations on the Atlantic porbeagle which, despite dwindling numbers, failed to earn protection at the last meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), in 2007.
Sandbar, porbeagle and dusky shark populations in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico have been severely overfished; a recent article in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune noted that commercial fisheries target sandbar sharks because their dorsal fins command high prices in the shark-fin trade.