pore-forming protein

pore-forming protein

[′pȯr ‚fȯrm·iŋ ‚prō‚tēn]
(immunology)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Topsalysin (PRX302), an innovative, "First-in-Class" transmembrane pore-forming protein, was genetically modified to be activated only by enzymatically-active PSA, which is produced in large quantities within the prostate of men with prostate cancer.
(NASDAQ: SPHS), which is studying topsalysin (PRX302), a first-in-class, pore-forming protein, in late-stage clinical trials for the treatment of patients with urological diseases, has announced the conclusion of the ongoing investigation into the previously reported death of a patient in the company's Phase 2b trial for the treatment of localized prostate cancer is unlikely to be related to either topsalysin or the procedure.
Stochastic sensing of organic analytes by a pore-forming protein containing a molecular adapter.
Feil, "Pore-forming protein toxins: from structure to function," Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology, vol.
Bayley, "A photogenerated pore-forming protein," Chemistry and Biology, vol.
Although not considered a module, the central portion of each protein (~ 40 kDa) is designated MACPF to emphasize its conservation among the MAC proteins and its sequence similarity to perforin, a 70 kDa pore-forming protein released from secretory granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes.
Purification and characterization of a pore-forming protein from the marine sponge Tethya lyncurium.
Both STIM1 and a plasma membrane pore-forming protein known as Orai1 have recently been identified as essential components of the so-called the calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channel.
Ostreolysin a pore-forming protein from the oyster mushroom, interacts specifically with membrane cholesterol-rich lipid domains.
In theory, cells bathed in the pore-forming protein, then exposed to a specific wavelength of light might open themselves up just long enough to admit a drug before shutting back down.
Scientists from Kunming Institute of Zoology under Chinese Academy of Sciences have found that the pore-forming proteins in the skin of Bombina maxima, a species of toad in southwest China, have the function of inducing tissue repair and promoting scar-free healing of wounds.