port-wine stain


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Related to port-wine stain: nevus flammeus, Port Wine Nevus

port-wine stain

[′pȯrt ‚wīn ‚stān]
(medicine)
A congenital hemangioma characterized by one or more red to purplish patches, usually on the face.
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Table 1 Port-wine stain patients demographics (n=69).
As lyrical and alluring as Poe's own original work, The Port-Wine Stain captures the magic, mystery, and madness of the great American author while weaving an eerie and original tale in homage to him.
Treatment of port-wine stains is usually done with pulsed dye laser therapy that yields better results when applied to lesions in the face and trunk, as compared to extremities [10].
He notices her worsening mood whenever they encounter a couple that includes a partner with a port-wine stain (173).
"In the absence of any functional deficit," the physician-reviewer declared, "the insurer's decision to deny coverage is upheld." In July 2001, another physician-reviewer turned down a Massachusetts girl's request for laser surgery to deal with a large port-wine stain that extended from her left arm to her upper chest.
For instance, they may be less favourably perceived in terms of aesthetic qualities (extent to which the person is perceived as ugly or repulsive); origin (a port-wine stain is likely to be perceived as having a medical origin, while the wheelchair might be the result of either a medical condition or an accident); course (the use of a wheelchair could be perceived as a temporary condition from which one will recover, but the port-wine stain is often perceived as permanent and, in fact, often becomes more noticeable with age).
The port-wine stain is another type ofvascular birthmark that occurs in 3 in 1,000 infants.
About 10 years ago, scientists developed an argon-laser therapy for adults with port-wine stain. But the argon laser failed to win wide pediatric use because it produced unacceptable scars in children.
One patient each with nevus spilus had nevus of Ota and a melanocytic nevus in association-only one such association each has been reported in the literature.15,16 Brown and Gorlin demonstrated oral mucosal involvement in a case of nevus unius lateris.13 Lesions of nevus sebaceous can extend on to the oral mucosa.17 Port-wine stain can involve the oral mucosa either alone or with other associated syndromes.18 In case of nevus of Ota, ipsilateral eye shows a diffuse bluish discoloration of the sclera and a patchy brownish color of the conjunctiva.
[3] It is important to note that NOT all individuals with port-wine stain have SWS.
The child also had a "port-wine stain" on the right side of his face along the distribution of the trigeminal nerve.