portal

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portal

1. an entrance, gateway, or doorway, esp one that is large and impressive
2. Anatomy
a. of or relating to a portal vein
b. of or relating to a porta

Portal

An entrance, gate, or door to a building or courtyard, often decorated; it marks the transition from the public exterior to the private interior space.

Portal

 

in architecture, an opening, usually an entrance into a building. Typical ancient Egyptian and ancient Greek portals were simply ornamented and had level crosspieces. In ancient Mesopotamia portals were arched, and in the Near and Middle East peshtak portals were typical; these were rectangular and had a cut-out lancet arch. Beginning in the 11th century arched, or perspective, portals became widespread in romanesque, gothic, and ancient Russian architecture. These portals were projections whose corners had columns joined by archivolts. Renaissance and baroque portals usually had pilasters and columns that supported the entablature or frontal.

portal

[′pȯrd·əl]
(anatomy)
Of or pertaining to the porta hepatis.
Pertaining to the portal vein or system.
(engineering)
A redundant frame consisting of two uprights connected by a third member at the top.
(mining engineering)
An entrance to a mine.
The rock face at which a tunnel is started.

portal

1. An impressive or monumental entrance, gate, or door to a building or courtyard, often decorated.
2. A structural framework consisting of a beam supported by two columns to which it is connected with sufficient rigidity to hold virtually unchanged the original angles between the intersecting members. (See illustration p. 752.)

PORTAL

(1)
Process-Oriented Real-Time Algorithmic Language.

["PORTAL - A Pascal-based Real-Time Programming Language", R. Schild in Algorithmic Languages, J.W. deBakker et al eds, N-H 1981].

portal

(World-Wide Web)
A website that aims to be an entry point to the World-Wide Web, typically offering a search engine and/or links to useful pages, and possibly news or other services. These services are usually provided for free in the hope that users will make the site their default home page or at least visit it often. Popular examples are Yahoo and MSN. Most portals on the Internet exist to generate advertising income for their owners, others may be focused on a specific group of users and may be part of an intranet or extranet. Some may just concentrate on one particular subject, say technology or medicine, and are known as a vertical portals.

portal

(1) See Facebook Portal.

(2) A Web "supersite" that provides search, news, blogs, discussion groups and shopping. General-purpose portals such as Yahoo!, MSN and AOL also offer free email, while TV network and newspaper portals do not. Some portals allow the home page to be personalized (see personal portal). Prior to the Web, CompuServe and AOL functioned as portals, aggregating information from various sources.

The "Vortal" Vertical Portal
Trade magazines, associations and special interest groups host vertical portals (vortals) that provide news and articles applicable to their industry. The vortal may include top news stories and weather, but search is typically limited to its own archives. See corporate portal, business intelligence portal and portal server.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bile duct proliferation and portal fibrosis. Mild bile duct proliferation accompanied by portal fibrosis was found in 8% of the animals (Table 1, Figure 3).
Neither of these duration stratifications demonstrated a significant relationship with centrilobular necrosis, pericellular/sinusoidal fibrosis, or portal fibrosis.
In fact, in our model of selective biliary ligation, obstruction of the biliary ducts responsible for drainage of the median, left lateral, and caudate lobes was followed by biliary proliferation and portal fibrosis in the whole liver, including the unobstructed right lobe (1).
Non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis (Idiopathic portal hypertension): experience with 151 patients and a review of the literature.
[19] on the mechanisms for intensive fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis, in which they demonstrated strong correlation between portal fibrosis and periportal ductular reaction with expansion of hepatic progenitor cells.
For Histopathology routine Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was done and liver fibrosis was evaluated using Metavir scale.9 Every specimen was staged for fibrosis on a five-point scale; F0 = no fibrosis; F1 = portal fibrosis without septa; F2 = portal fibrosis with rare septa; F3 = numerous septae without cirrhosis; and F4 = cirrhosis.
The histological samples were analyzed using the METAVIR algorithm: (22) F0 = no fibrosis, F1 = portal fibrosis without septa, F2 = few septa, F3 = numerous septa without cirrhosis, and F4 = cirrhosis.
Several semiquantitative staging systems have been validated, such as the METAVIR score, which evaluates fibrosis on a 5-point scale (FO = no fibrosis, F1 = portal fibrosis without septa, F2 = portal fibrosis and few septa, F3 = septal fibrosis without cirrhosis, F4 = cirrhosis) (4).
Portal fibrosis and inflammatory activity were assessed using semiquantitative histopathological scores as described in Russo et al.
Of the individual morphologic features of NASH, pericellular fibrosis and portal fibrosis were the only ones associated with splenomegaly, even when using higher thresholds for the definition of splenomegaly (P < .001, P = .001, and P = .001, respectively; and P < .001, P = .02, and P = .01, respectively).
Fibrosis was staged on a scale of 0-4: F0 = no fibrosis, F1 = portal fibrosis without septa, F2 = few septa, F3 = numerous septa without cirrhosis, and F4 = cirrhosis.
Fibrosis was staged on a scale of F0-F4 (F0, no fibrosis; F1, portal fibrosis without septa; F2, portal fibrosis with rare septa; F3, numerous septa without cirrhosis; F4, liver cirrhosis) according to the METAVIR scoring system [23].