portulaca oleracea


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Related to portulaca oleracea: purslane
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purslane
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purslane
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purslane

purslane

Ground cover plant with reddish spaghetti-like stems and green waxy propeller shaped leaves, yellow flowers. Loves sunlight, not shade. Eat the stems along with the leaves. Has a refreshing tart lemony flavor. In North America it's considered a weed, in other countries it's a popular salad vegetable. It is the highest herbal land plant source of Omega 3, 6 and even some omega 9 fatty acids. Extremely rich in Vitamin C. Contains dopa and noradrenaline (norepinephrine), making it great for allergies, growth hormone production, thyroid, adrenal, pituitary, and the entire endocrine system (all glands). Very delicious and nutritious. Can eat raw or steam for 15 seconds, add butter, salt and pepper, mmmmn. You can take the stems, marinate them and use as noodles.You can also take the whole plant, dehydrate it and make purslane powder which you can sprinkle on things through the winter months. Very delicious, very nutritious and heart healthy. Can spread a lot- they drop 50,000 seeds at one time. The only plant that looks like purslane but isn't really edible is spurge. The way to tell the difference is spurge has a white sap inside the stem, which isn't red like purslane stems. Purslane makes a good companion plant by providing ground cover to create a humid microclimate for nearby plants, stabilizing ground moisture. Its deep roots bring up moisture and nutrients that those plants can use.
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Moreover, Portulaca oleracea was not recorded because its flowers are cleistogamus under reduced light intensity (Miyanishi & Cavers, 1984).
Acetic acid induced writhing test in mice assessed the peripheral analgesic activity of Portulaca oleracea. Acetic acid triggers the production of irritant substances within the peritoneum which caused the writhing response.
Saleh, "Antioxidant effect of purslane (Portulaca oleracea) and its mechanism of action," Journal of Medicinal Plants Research, vol.
La Portulaca oleracea (Verdolagas), es una planta herbacea (Portulacaceae), es una planta que crece hasta 80 cm de altura, con flores pequenas amarillas, de vida corta, que posteriormente son reemplazadas por capsulas que maduran rapidamente liberando semillas negras que son bastante grandes para la pequena estatura de las plantas.
Oleracein E (OE) (8,9-dihydroxy-1,5,6,10b-tetrahydro-2H-pyrroio[2,1-a]isoquinoline-3-one), an alkaloid possessing tetrahydroisoquinoline and pyrrolidone skeletons, was first isolated from the edible and medicinal plant Portulaca oleracea L.
Portulaca oleracea, also known as purslane, has long been used in various traditional medicine systems to relieve pain and edema.
Amaranthaceae 20,00 18 Fimbristily miliacae (L.) Vahl Cyperaceae 20,00 19 Portulaca oleracea L.
Purslane, known formally as portulaca oleracea, invades gardens and even sprouts from sidewalk cracks.
Durante su almuerzo en la milpa, los agricultores pueden buscar plantas con hojas tiernas de verdolagas (Portulaca oleracea), mumu (Piper auritum), tsuy (Sinclairia discolor), lengua de vaca (Rumex obtusifolius) o chipilin (Crotalaria longirostrata), disponibles in situ para recalentar el caldo de frijol que acompanan de tortilla, chile y limon (cuadro 1).
Banano Citrus sinensis Naranja Citrus aurantifolia Limon Lactuca sativa Lechuga Yucca guatemalensis Yuca pie de elefante Urera caracasana Chichicaste Portulaca oleracea Verdolaga Nombre cientifico Familia Uso como (*): c F M T Daucus carota Apiaceae X Coriandrum sativum Apiaceae X Solarium tuberosum Solanaceae X Solarium lycopersicum Solanaceae Capsicum annuum Solanaceae Allium cepa Amarylhdaceae X Brassica oleracea var.