positive feedback


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to positive feedback: Positive feedback loop

positive feedback

[′päz·əd·iv ′fēd‚bak]
(control systems)
Feedback in which a portion of the output of a circuit or device is fed back in phase with the input so as to increase the total amplification. Also known as reaction (British usage); regeneration; regenerative feedback; retroaction (British usage).
References in periodicals archive ?
It could be intuitively stated that a positive feedback "never stops" and is necessarily associated with a runaway regime.
2009), and delivering consistent and contingent positive feedback (Hattie & Timperley, 2007).
A hallmark of social identity maintenance is the need to seek positive feedback from the in-group before attempting to exhibit competency to people outside the group (Turner and Horvitz, 2001).
We all know that positive feedback is one of the tools managers have to help motivate their employees, yet when I talk to employees at all levels, the thing I hear most often is "I don't get enough feedback from my boss, and when I do it's negative.
To avoid confusion, a more useful term for positive feedback might be self-reinforcing feedback.
Positive feedback and nonlinearity, which are ingredients in a wide range of animal interactions, enable animal groups to generate behaviors that are more than the sum of their parts, Sumpter says.
Impressed at the quality and speed of the service, the buyer responds with positive feedback for the vendor and everyone is happy.
In many cases, additional indirect effects will lead to processes involving positive feedback that amplify the warming.
This gives me a rewarding and interesting job where lives depend on me, and I get constant positive feedback.
Here are three that have garnered positive feedback.
We received very, very positive feedback from the public because we had such a large uniformed presence in the town using local beat officers and PCSOs," added Insp Mead.
Positive feedback leads even the most difficult pupils to behave better, according to academics at Liverpool John Moores University.

Full browser ?