postcentral gyrus


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Related to postcentral gyrus: precentral gyrus, Prefrontal cortex, parietal lobe

postcentral gyrus

[pōst′sen·trəl ′jī·rəs]
(anatomy)
The cerebral convolution that lies immediately posterior to the central sulcus and extends from the longitudinal fissure above the posterior ramus of the lateral sulcus.
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It increases with increasing interelectrode distance, in particular in the upper limb cortical area, when the anode falls into the postcentral gyrus. However, one can notice its limited variability across the different interelectrode distances and across the models.
T Z p (unc) X 7 z Label 3.72 3.22 <0.001 4 -88 6 Cuneus BA18 (R) 5.21 4.13 <0.0001 2 56 -6 Medial frontal gyrus (R) 5.00 4.01 <0.0001 60 -60 26 Superior temporal gyrus (R) 4.66 3.82 <0.0001 24 -34 72 Postcentral gyrus (R) 3.74 3.24 <0.001 44 -34 58 3.60 3.14 <0.001 22 -4 66 Superior frontal gyrus (R) 4.51 3.73 <0.0001 4 26 50 Superior frontal gyrus, frontal sup medial (R) 4.22 3.55 <0.001 -42 32 -2 Left inferior frontal gyrus (L) 4.15 3.49 <0.001 10 -76 -28 Cerebellum crus1 (R)
The main finding revealed that the bilateral postcentral gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, claustrum, insula, and anterior lobe of cerebellum, as well as the left posterior lobe of the cerebellum, were activated when HT7 acupoint was stimulated.
We found that ReHo in the right caudate and inferior temporal gyrus was higher in both schizophrenic patient groups than in the healthy controls whereas ReHo in the bilateral postcentral gyrus and thalamus and the right inferior occipital gyrus was lower in both schizophrenic patient groups (FDR corrected, P < 0.05).
Major Finding: The area of the postcentral gyrus representing the face was about 0.5 mm thicker and showed greater functional activation in response to pain in patients with high- versus low-frequency migraines.
Speaking: Areas of activation were observed bilaterally in the superior frontal gyrus (BA6), and the insula (BA13) and the inferior parietal lobule (BA47), the superior parietal lobule (BA7), the superior temporal gyrus (BA22) and the postcentral gyrus (BA43) of the left hemisphere, the superior temporal gyrus (BA 42, 38) and the precentral gyrus (BA6) of the right hemisphere.
In comparison, several brain regions in the right hemisphere showed a marked decrease in response amplitude after four days of visual training, including the fusiform gyrus, postcentral gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus (Table 1(b)).
Furthermore, we found that most of the selected channels were distributed along the side of the postcentral gyrus in two participants.
The discriminative brain regions include postcentral gyrus, paracentral lobule, posterior cingulate cortex, calcarine, orbital superior frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, Heschl gyrus, superior occipital gyrus, amygdala, middle temporal gyrus, orbital inferior frontal gyrus, and insula.
Eight significant clusters were found with increased brain activation from pre- to post-training, compared with non-CRT patients [Table 2] and [Figure 2], (1) the left inferior frontal gyrus (1120 mm [sup]3, BA9); (2) the left medial frontal gyrus (512 mm [sup]3, BA32); (3) the right middle frontal gyrus (464 mm [sup]3, BA6); (4) the left precentral gyrus (416 mm [sup]3, BA6); (5) the right postcentral gyrus (416 mm [sup]3, BA2); (6) the left medial frontal gyrus (352 mm [sup]3, BA6); (7) the right sub-gyral (296 mm [sup]3, BA6); and (8) the left sub-gyral (216 mm [sup]3, BA6).
They found that the 'small world' property of the brain network of patients with schizophrenia was abnormal: (a) compared to normal brains the characteristic path length and the clustering coefficient increased; (b) the nodes in some brain areas had decreased centrality and thinner cortices (especially the left parahippocampal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, angular gyrus, and right superior frontal gyrus, which are part of the default network); and (c) the nodes in other brain areas had increased centrality, including nodes in the primary cortex (bilateral precuneous, left precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus, and right Heschl gyrus) and the paralymbic system (bilateral orbital frontal gyrus, temporal pole, right cingulate tract, and inferior parietal gyrus).
Compared with the resting-state, acupuncture at the real acupoints activated brain regions primarily in the left calcarine gyrus, bilateral middle occipital gyrus (BA19), bilateral middle temporal gyrus (left BA 22), left inferior temporal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left superior medial prefrontal gyrus (left BA 10), right anterior cingulate cortex (right BA 10), left postcentral gyrus, left caudate nucleus, and the bilateral cerebellum (Crus 2 and VIII).